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The Community Store

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 06/06/2014 - 04:23
The Community Store reopened its doors on May 24 after being closed for three years. Established in 1918 by Mr. Amasa ("Mace") Fulcher, the store soon established itself as the focal point of commerce and social activity on the "Creek" side of the village.












As island tourism expanded, the Community Store porch, with a long bench and comfortable rockers, became a favorite place for locals and visitors to retreat from the sun, relax, and interact.

Lauren & Joseph, the new proprietors, have had a few unexpected set-backs in getting the shelves stocked, but new items are arriving regularly. You will find fresh produce, organic items, and baked goods, along with cold drinks and snacks. The new entrepreneurs are excited about stocking a larger selection of organic foods as well as milk and eggs from an eastern North Carolina dairy.

Lauren & Joseph plan to expand their products with beer & wine, selected marine items and beach supplies (sunscreen, chap stick, etc.). Before the end of the season they hope to offer deli sandwiches and seating on the rear deck on the shore of Silver Lake.

Be sure to stop by, do some shopping, and encourage the Community Store's new owners to continue working to bring new life into this iconic island business.  

You can read a history of the Community Store here:  http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092106.htm.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Letter from Tobias Knight

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 06/05/2014 - 04:40
In 1718 Tobias Knight, Secretary of the Colony of North Carolina, and Collector of His Majesty's Customs, penned a letter to Edward Teach. The letter begins "My ffriend," and continues with further indications of a close connection between the colony's highest officials and the pirate captain.

I know how difficult it is for us today to think that politicians and criminals might be in cahoots with each other...but try to imagine this nefarious collusion of almost 300 years ago. Herewith the incriminating letter:

November 17, 1718 

My ffriend,

If this finds you yet in harbour I would have you make the best of your way up as soon as possible your affairs will let you. I have something more to to say to you than at present I can write; The bearer will tell you the end of our Indian Warr, and Ganet can tell you in part what I have to say to you, so referr you in some measure to him.

I really think these three men are heartily sorry at their difference with you, and will be very willing to ask your pardon.  If I may advise, be ffriends again, its better than falling out among your selves.

I expect the Governor this night or tomorrow, who I believe would be likewise glad to see you before you goe, I have not time to add save my hearty respects to you, and am your real ffriend, And Servant.

T. Knight

--------------------------------------
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Bikes

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 05:09
Ever since the state of North Carolina began paving island roads in the 1950s, bicycles have been a popular method of local transportation. But bikes do not work well in sand. This photo was taken at the airport ramp on Memorial Day weekend. These are just a few of the many bikes laid down by the side of the path.















The riders made it that far before abandoning their bikes and walking across to the ocean for a few hours in the sun and surf.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Women's Rights

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/03/2014 - 04:58
If I remember correctly, the first women to secure jobs as deckhands on North Carolina ferries were hired in the 1970s. Even then, some men considered it "bad luck" to have women working on boats. Much has changed since then. Today a number of women work on the ferries, and a few are captains.

On the other hand, perhaps the attitudes of the mid-twentieth century are the anomalies. I recently came across this report from 1879, in the Raleigh News & Observer:

"An imperfect diary, kept by Gen. John Gray Blount [1752-1833], contains some interesting information. He states that when he was a very young man, an old man on Ocracoke told him that the first vessel ever piloted over Ocracoke bar, was brought in by a woman name Patsey Caraway, and at that time the channel ran so near the land that you could 'chunk a biscuit' on the deck of a vessel."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.  


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Silver Lake

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/02/2014 - 04:23
Native islanders almost always refer to our harbor as "The Creek." More formally it is called "Cockle Creek," a name used for generations. Prior to WWII this picturesque body of water was shallow...not more than four feet deep. On the southeast border of the creek two languid streams (the "Big Gut" and the "Little Gut") ebbed and flowed as they carried brackish water toward the "bald beach."

The harbor was, and still is, a tidal creek that is connected to Pamlico Sound by "the ditch," the narrow opening used by ferries and other water craft. In the 1930s, and again during WWII, the Creek was dredged to provide a suitable harbor for larger boats and US Navy vessels. In the process, the two streams were filled in.

Local oral history suggests that native islander and entrepreneur Stanley Wahab re-christened the harbor "Silver Lake" after the initial dredging operation in order to attract tourists. There is no doubt that Stanley Wahab popularized the more colorful name in order to promote his new "Wahab Village Hotel" (now Blackbeard's Lodge).

The designation "Silver Lake" is older than that, however. In an 1890 newspaper promotion in The Daily Journal (New Bern, NC), the Spencer brothers, new owners of the Ocracoke Hotel (1885-1900), refer to "Silver Lake, a beautiful sheet of water...immediately in the rear and offer[ing] a sail for the timid who fear the sound or ocean, a bath for those who dread the surf, and fishing for any one who prefer to angle for perch rather than trout or blue fish."

The Ocracoke Hotel, 1898











The Spencer brothers were from Washington, NC, and it took many years for islanders to feel comfortable with the new name for our harbor. Even today, most O'cockers continue to call the harbor "The Creek."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Ferry Tips

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sun, 06/01/2014 - 04:39
Below is some valuable information from the NC Department of Transportation for folks traveling to Ocracoke via the Hatteras-Ocracoke ferries:

Hatteras-Ocracoke: On the Ferry System's most popular summer route, motorists who arrive at Hatteras before 10am or after 3pm will generally avoid the daily crowds, as will travelers who get to Ocracoke's South Dock before 2pm or after 7pm. In addition, the busiest summer days on the Hatteras Inlet route are Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. "People who make their day trips on Monday or Friday stand a much better chance of avoiding long waits," says Hatteras Port Captain Walter Goodwin.

Ferry Crossing Hatteras Inlet (NCDOT)















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Home?

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sat, 05/31/2014 - 04:32
My neighbor, Edward Norvell, sent me these photos of an exposed shipwreck near the Pony Pen. We think these timbers might be what is left of the steamboat Home that wrecked near there in 1837. Ninety people (men, women, and children) lost their lives in that terrible disaster.

Walter Howard recounted the story as he heard it many years ago from Kade Williams. I have reproduced Walter's article on our web site: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news100104.htm.

The ship's timbers were exposed recently, but they are slowly being covered again as strong winds blow across the beach.

































Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.



Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Spartina

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 05/30/2014 - 04:37
On Monday afternoon I biked down to the Community Square. There I met Steve Earley, captain and owner of a beautiful 17' sailboat, Spartina. Steve built this wooden yawl-rigged boat himself...and it was a delight to behold. Steve told me he has sailed his vessel extensively in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina (in the Chesapeake Bay, Pamlico Sound, and even off shore).



















Steve's sailboat is named after an eastern coastal cord grass, and a book of the same name by John Casey, a "classic tale of a man, a boat, and a storm." You can read about Steve's adventures, and see superb photos (Steve is staff photographer for the Virginian-Pilot), on his blog: http://logofspartina.blogspot.com/. You can also read an excellent article by Capt. Rob Temple in the Ocracoke Current: http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/88371.

Life on Ocracoke so often brings us in contact with interesting, talented, and creative folks who enrich our lives with their presence, at times enduring, at other times fleeting. Steve was on his way early the next morning.

Happy sailing, Steve!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

More About the Curious Children

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 05/29/2014 - 05:04
A bit more research re. yesterdays post has yielded the following article from The Tarboro Southerner, dated 6 February, 1879:

"We have received the following letter from a prominent physician of Louisville, Ky., regarding the case [of the three children with night blindness] and trust some one will inform us whether the parents of these children, or their ancestors, were of blood relation:

"Louisville, Ky., Jan. 30th, 1879 Editor Tarboro Southerner: -- I see an extract from your paper in reference to the blindness of some children of James Howard. I have seen a great many such cases. Hemeralopie, or night blindness, is only a symptom. The disease is a pigmentary degeneration of the retina, or perceptive layer of the eye. With the ophthalmoscope, with which the back of the eye can be examined, small spots of black pigment are seen, especially at the periphery of the retina. They commence showing themselves there and gradually travel in towards the centre of the eye, ‘til, in time, it leads to total blindness. Some cases never become entirely blind. You will find that by covering one eye of the child and testing the other that sight is only central. That is, let the child look straight ahead and you will find that it will be unable to see anything held to the right or left, or above or below. The disease is said to come from the marriage of blood relatives. I have found it to be so in only a few cases. It would be interesting to know whether Mr. H. and wife were related or not. If Mr. Howard was not related to his wife before marriage, probably there was some inter-marrying some years back. Nothing can be done to stop the disease. W.C."

From http://www.lvpei.org/resources/eye-faq/blindnessdue.htmlI gleaned this information: "What are the diseases associated with consanguineous marriages? Retinitis Pigmentosa is a hereditary degeneration and atrophy of the retina. It is usually progressive and leads to reduced peripheral vision that causes tunnel vision, night blindness and loss of vision. This disease affects children and young adults."

In fact, my great grandparents were second cousins. They shared one set of common great grandparents. (That makes my father and me fourth cousins once removed...and my children and me fifth cousins once removed...and I am my own fifth cousin! We are fortunate that my mother's family was from Hungary!)

So, was it Vitamin A deficiency or intermarriage?  Perhaps it was a combination of both, but to my knowledge, my grandfather and his siblings did not exhibit night blindness as adults.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Three Curious Children

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 05/28/2014 - 04:50
I recently discovered an interesting newspaper article re-printed in the Cincinnati Enquirer, dated January 10, 1879. Originally published in the Tarboro (NC) Southerner, the article was titled "Three Curious North Carolina Children."

The article is about three children of my great-grandparents James Howard (1839-1904) & Zilphia Howard (1841-1919). The three children are my grandfather, Homer Howard, (1868-1947), Sabra Howard (1870-1951), and Wheeler Howard (1874-1940).

Herewith the article:

"A remarkable case of defective vision is that of three children of James Howard, a seafaring man, whose family live on Ocracoke Island. They become totally blind each day, immediately after the sun goes down. If by chance they happen to be in the yard playing when the sun sets, their playthings are instantly laid aside, and efforts made to reach the house, when they soon after retire, and sleep soundly until sunrise, after which their sight is described as being restored, and to all appearances perfectly unimpaired. The youngest is three and the eldest ten years old -- two boys and one girl, all of light complexion. Their eyes are light blue and there is nothing about them that appears at all strange."

On first reading I thought this an extremely odd story. I had never heard about anything of the sort. Nor had cousin Blanche. She thought perhaps the children were playing a prank on their parents, or maybe my great grandfather was playing a prank on the reporter. We laughed about other mischief the Howards were known for.

However, after a bit of research I discovered that a deficiency of Vitamin A can lead to a condition called "nightime blindness." This is what Wikipedia has to say:

"Nyctalopia (from Greek νύκτ-, nykt- 'night'; αλαός, alaos 'blind, not seeing', and ὄψ, ops 'eye') also called 'Night Blindness' is a condition making it difficult or impossible to see in relatively low light. It is a symptom of several eye diseases. Night blindness may exist from birth, or be caused by injury or malnutrition (for example, a lack of vitamin A). It can be described as insufficient adaptation to darkness."

Given Ocracoke's remote location and the difficulty islanders sometimes had obtaining fresh vegetables, I wouldn't be surprised if the children had a Vitamin A deficiency.

Remember when your mamma told you to eat your carrots to help you see better? Carrots are a good source of Vitamin A.

The connection between night blindness and vitamin A was not made until 1925. L. S. Fridericia and E. Holm figured it out.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Poison Ivy

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 05/27/2014 - 05:10
It is that time of year again! Poison Ivy has erupted in various places around the island...along footpaths, climbing on fences, in overgrown lots. This photo of a thriving patch of the dreaded weed was taken earlier in the month along the Hammock Hills Nature Trail (across from the NPS campground).















As long as you can identify this luxurious, bright green, three-leafed plant, and don't go tromping through the woods in short pants, you probably needn't worry about breaking out in a rash. Even on the Nature Trail it is easy to avoid the poison ivy if you simply keep your eyes open!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Don't Believe...

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 05/26/2014 - 04:42
...everything you read!

Many readers of this blog may be familiar with Ben Dixon MacNeill's 1958 book, The Hatterasman. One on-line reviewer described it as "a history of the Outer Banks" written in a "journalistic style."

MacNeill does include much Hatteras and Ocracoke history, but be wary of his facts and details. This is what he wrote about Edward Teach and the Ocracoke Island Howards:

"Howard was quartermaster aboard Captain Edward Teach's Queene Anne's Revenge when she had her misfortuned duel with Lieutenant Maynard [actually former quartermaster William Howard was in jail in Williamsburg, Virginia at that time] in what has become Teach's Hole at the western end of the second Island, just beyond Ocracoke village. Howard went over the side when his captain fell, traditionally with a silver goblet containing grog [a fanciful tale if there ever was one]. He swam ashore and lost himself among the native population [as far as we can tell, no one was living on Ocracoke when Blackbeard's final battle took place, in 1718].

"Henry [?] Howard lost himself but not his silver cup, which is preserved, after 238 years, by his descendant who owns also the High Point of the Hills [this is a dune 4.5 miles south of Buxton, on Hatteras Island, not Ocracoke], and there is nowhere a more satisfying vessel [unfortunately, I've never heard of it] than this when its outside is fretted with cold sweat and inside it is a compounding of ice, fresh leaves of mint, and some ancestral rum that has lived its long and respected life in a wooden keg [a mighty elaborate beverage for islanders who traditionally indulged in nothing more sophisticated than homemade meal wine]."

Oh well, MacNeill does preface his book with these honest words: "This is not a history. I am not a historian...."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

A River of an Ocean

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sun, 05/25/2014 - 04:28
A while ago I mentioned Simon Winchester's book, Atlantic.

Celebrating the magnificent diversity of this colossal body of sea water, Winchester pens these stirring words:

"[T]he Atlantic Ocean [is] a sinuous snakelike river of an ocean, stretching thousands of miles from the Stygian fogs of the north to the Roaring Forties in the south, riven with deeps in its western chasms, dangerous with shallows in eastern plains, a place of cod and flying fish, of basking sharks and blue-finned tuna, of gyres of Sargasso weed and gyres of unborn hurricanes, a placed of icebergs and tides, whirlpools and sandbanks, submarine canyons and deep-sea black smokers and ridges and seamounts, of capes and rises and fracture zones, of currents hot, cold, torrential, and languorous, of underwater volcanoes and earthquakes, of stromatolites and cyanobacteria and horseshoe crabs, of seabird colonies, of penguins and polar bears and manta rays, of giant squid and jellyfish and their slow-and-steady southern majesties, the great and glorious wandering albatrosses."

Such it is!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

A Memorable Musical Week

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sat, 05/24/2014 - 05:00
Recent island buzz has centered around Julia Howard's musical, A Tale of Blackbeard. Revived after a two-decades-long hiatus, the play, with a new cast under the direction of Charles Temple and Desiree Ricker, delighted audiences with four outstanding performances last week, redefining community theater for islanders and visitors alike.

The musical will continue with Monday night shows from June 9 - August 11. More information is available here: http://www.ocrafolkfestival.org/blackbeard. To read Susan Dodd's review please click here: http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/87933.

Below are a few photographs of a recent performance taken by island resident Brenda Kremser.

Matthew Tolson, Blackbeard
Derek Gilliam, Pirate
Bill Jones & Trisha Davis,
Mr. Farthingham & Miss Euphemia

Mariah Temple & Samantha Styron,
Katherine & Elizabeth
Waylon Underwood & Kade Nagakane,
Richard Evans & Pirate
Ezekiel & Marjorie,
Bill Cole & Katy Mitchell
Sierra Winstead, Chrisi Gaskill,
Lori Masaitis, Caroline Temple,
& Callie Davisson,
Village Girls
Blackbeard & Richard Dueling

































































































































Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Dance

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 05/23/2014 - 04:52
I recently discovered The Square Dance History Project.  I even submitted a contribution: my booklet describing the traditional Ocracoke Island Square Dance. Curious about the connection between our island dance and Appalachian Big Circle dances I explored the site.

I soon discovered a 1987/2013 article about "Set Running, a Southern Folk Dance," by John M. Ramsay. 

Ramsay's article is titled SOUTHERN FOLK DANCE, and may be found here: http://squaredancehistory.org/files/original/283940993da3e0bbe509b292bb29ad58.pdf.














So much about the dances that Ramsay describes are identical or very similar to the format of the Ocracoke dance. Ramsay's final words echo our sentiments about why we continue to keep our island dance tradition alive:

"On the [modern] dance floor, the circle has given way and dancers have become lonely dots often in a grid formation.

"There are signs that people are beginning to realize the price which has been paid for 'do your own thing.' There is growing interest in the dances of our ancestors which can teach us to join hands again. The message of the circle is still strong. It can speak to us again. It is interesting to see the reaction of pre- teenage boys and girls to an opportunity to run a set in the old way. In that unsure age, between the openness of childhood and the acculturated world of adults, youth at first resist the circle as an alien experience. But, within five minutes of creating the circle, propelled through society's hangups by natural curiosity and by traditional music, their faces begin to relax, smiles break out and they understand, more readily than adults, the powerful and wholesome message of the circle. Our dance circle is still there, a cultural residual which has weathered many changes of society. It is ready to help us put community life back together. 'All hands up and circle left!'"

If you will be on the island during the upcoming OcraFolk Festival be sure to grab a partner, join us on the dance floor, and swing your partner!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Firemen's Ball

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 05/22/2014 - 05:02
The ninth annual Ocracoke Volunteer Firemen’s Ball will be held this Saturday, May 24.

The Firemen's Ball was started years ago when a couple of talented musicians who love Ocracoke gathered to play music and raise some money for a good cause. Since then the original group (The Dune Dogs) out of Raleigh, NC, with the help of local band The Ocracoke Rockers, have come together every year to make this fundraiser a huge success.

Bidding at the Auction















Not only is it a good time, it is an important fundraiser for the fire department. Thanks to the continued support of sponsors, donors and volunteers, last year’s ball was again very successful. Together it raised $76,220 – and netted after expenses over $68,000 for the Ocracoke Volunteer Fire Department Building Fund!

Come on out to the Community Center on Saturday, and help support our Volunteer Fire Department.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:
  •  4:30-6:30 Silent Auction 
  • 5:00-6:30 Pig Pickin' Or until food runs out, which it always does - plates are $12, and include a drink. Inside, donations accepted for cold beer generously donated by City Beverage Co. 
  • 7:00 Live Auction 
  • 8:30 Live Music (Donations to get in accepted at the door)
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the curious story of Vera/Charlie Williams. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
    Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

    Vera....

    Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 05/21/2014 - 04:55
    ...or Charlie?

    In 1921 & 1922 the curious story of Charles Irvin Williams, Ocracoke Island native who was raised as a girl (for 21 years family, friends & neighbors knew him as Vera), was published in newspapers across America, including North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, Nebraska, New Jersey, and New York.

    You can read the whole story in our latest Ocracke Newsletter: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052114.htm.
    Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

    Wococon

    Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 05/20/2014 - 04:27
    In 1585 John White drew a map of the New World. A small island along the coast is labeled "Wococon."

    On subsequent maps, until 1706, the island was variously called Wokokon, Wococock, Wosoton, and Wocoton. Two maps, in 1672 & 1675 respectively, used the unusual spelling "Okok."

    By 1709 the "W" had been permanently dropped, resulting in Ocacok, Occacoke, Occeh, Ocreecock, Oakerccok, and a few other variations.

    The first instance of our current spelling that I am aware of, Ocracoke, dates to an 1852 map by A.D. Bache. By the end of the Civil War that spelling had become standardized. Nevertheless, native islanders can still be heard referring to our home island as O'cock or Ocreecoke.

    Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
    Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

    Clam Rakes

    Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 05/19/2014 - 04:51
    A reader recently asked about clam rakes. When I was a youngster we used iron rakes like the one in the photo below. The tines were an eighth of an inch thick, and rusted easily. After several hours they became a burden to push.

    Old Clam Rake


















    Nowadays almost everyone uses rakes with tines fashioned from stainless steel table knife blades. They are less than half the thickness of the old tines, and are resistant to rust. The table knife blades cut through the sandy bottom almost effortlessly. Clamming is much easier now!

    New Clam Rake


















    Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.

    Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

    Oxalis

    Ocracoke Island Journal - Sun, 05/18/2014 - 05:15
    In1942 the Navy dredged Ocracoke's harbor (Cockle Creek/Silver Lake) in order to create a navigable basin for their vessels. In the process, they pumped many cubic yards of sand into adjacent yards and wetlands. This created what some of us jokingly call "nice high land."

    My yard is the farthest extent the sand was pumped toward the southeast of the harbor. As a result, I have to dig down ten or so inches to find darker, richer soil, so it is difficult to grow much in my front yard.

    Nevertheless, these hardy oxalis plants are thriving beside my fence.  















    They go to sleep every evening, then wake back up in the morning to welcome the new day.

    Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
    Categories: Outer Banks Blogs
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