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Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 06/10/2015 - 04:37
On March 25 of this year I published a blog about pilot and photographer, Garrett Fisher and his spectacular aerial photos of the Outer Banks.

Garrett has just published a book of his photos, Sea of Change, Flying the Outer Banks. The book is available for purchase on line, and he hopes to have them in stores on Ocracoke this summer.

















In his book, Fisher observes that "the essence of the Outer Banks is change.... Sand, surf, and sky are in a constantly rhythmic state of change.... Every single time I flew, the sand, ocean, currents, inlets, and sky looked different, [and] it was a matter of wholesale surprises each time...."

Sea of Change shows the Outer Banks as "more beautiful than most of us realize" and introduces us to aspects of these islands "that people do not know..., showing these unknown and poorly accessed areas in ways that are difficult if not impossible to see on the ground."

Garrett Fisher's book is a beautiful contribution to our understanding and appreciation of this fragile string of islands some of us call home.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Handwriting

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 04:48
On May 28 I wrote a blog post that included Kevin Duffus' photograph of a letter written in 1719.

Photo by Kevin Duffus

















A reader commented on the lovely handwriting. And that reminded me of my great-grandfather's nineteenth century shipwreck reports. James Howard's penmanship is not as beautiful as Ellis Brand's, and his spelling and grammar are unconventional by today's standards (spide, redeness, flud, etc.), but his handwriting was superior to most of ours today.   

Capt. James W. Howard's Report

















What a difference a few generations make! I seldom write letters, and my handwriting is a blend of printing and cursive. School children today are not even taught penmanship or cursive writing. All the more reason to treasure these letters and reports from the past.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Recitals

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/08/2015 - 04:44
Not long ago I was sitting on the pizer with Cousin Blanche. I can't remember what we were chatting about, but something reminded Blanche of a song from her youth (Blanche is 95 year old). She began to recite the lyrics of  "A Good Man is Hard to Find." (I did some research afterwards and discovered this song was composed and performed by Eddie Green during the time of piano rolls (1918). The song became a classic Blues standard, and was performed by Bessie Smith, Sophie Tucker, Frank Sinatra, and Brenda Lee. Flannery O'Connor wrote a short story with the same title in 1955.

Blanche recited the song flawlessly:

A good man is hard to find,
You always get the other kind
Just when you think that he's your pal,
You look for him and find him fooling around with some other gal
Then you rave, you even pray,
To see him lying in his grave.
So if your man is nice,
You better take my advice:
Hug him in the morning,
Kiss him every night,
Give him plenty of loving,
Treat him right
'Cause a good man nowadays is hard to find

When Blanche was finished with "A Good Man is Hard to Find" she was reminded of another song from her era, a hymn titled "A Perfect Day" written in 1909 by Carrie Jacobs-Bond (1862-1946). She recited that song for me also:

When you come to the end of a perfect day,
And you sit alone with your thought,
While the chimes ring out with a carol gay,
For the joy that the day has brought,
Do you think what the end of a perfect day
Can mean to a tired heart,
When the sun goes down with a flaming ray,
And the dear hearts have to part?
Well, this is the end of a perfect day,
Near the end of a journey, too,
But it leaves a thought that is big and strong,
With a wish that is kind and true.
For mem'ry has painted this perfect day
With colors that never fade,
And we find at the end of a perfect day,
The soul of a friend we've made.
But Blanche was just getting started. Next she began singing (not just reciting) "The Sidewalks of New York."

That reminded her of "A Bicycle Built for Two." I listened reverently as sweet melodies wafted down the sandy lane.

The song was over much too soon, but, alas, it was time for me to depart. Reluctantly, I arose, thanked her for the impromptu performance, and assured her I'd be back again before long.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Festival Kickoff

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 06/05/2015 - 05:21
Tonight, from 4 - 5 pm participants in Donald Davis' Storytelling Workshop will be sharing stories at Deepwater Theater.

From 5 - 7, at the Ocracoke Preservation Society Museum property, the Pony Island Restaurant will be providing fresh, locally caught fried fish and grilled chicken dinners for $15 a plate.

Between 6 & 7pm, at Berkley Manor, you can listen to Mahalo Jazz 2 (Alison Weiner on piano, vocals, and melodica) and Robbie Link (upright bass), two eclectic musicians coming together to have their delightful way with jazz standards and original tunes.


















While there, you can also place silent bids on a wonderful assortment of fine art pieces donated by islanders and festival participants. 

Be sure to stick around for the live auction which starts at 7 o'clock. Afterwards head over to the Live Oak Stage (at Books to be Red) for a World Music Jam at 9 o'clock...then to the Community Center for the Donald Thompson Blues Band (and cash bar) at 10 pm.

Of course, the rest of the weekend is filled with more music, arts & crafts, dance, and other creative events. I will be taking it all in, and will be back Monday morning!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Dance

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 06/04/2015 - 05:06
Every year at the Ocracoke Festival I lead a traditional island square dance.














The Ocracoke square dance was held regularly on the island from the mid 1700s until the early 1960s. In recent years the dance has been a feature of the Ocracoke Festival, the island's July 4th celebration, several fall get-togethers, and various other events. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the dances were often held in private homes. Later they were held in public spaces including the lodge of the old Doxsee Clam Factory, on the dock at Captain Bill Gaskill’s Pamlico Inn, at Stanley Wahab’s Silver Lake Inn (now the Island Inn), and in the building that now houses the Ocracoke Variety Store.

The Ocracoke Island dance is actually a big circle dance, much like big circle dances performed in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States. However, islanders traditionally referred to their dance as a square dance.

It is great fun...and easy to learn. Come out to the Community Square at 8 pm on Saturday for good music, energetic dancing, and good fun!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Festival 2015

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 04:46
The 2015 Ocracoke Music & Storytelling Festival begins this Friday, late afternoon, with stories, fish fry, art auction, jazz, blues, and a world music jam.

Click to Enlarge


















The festivities continue all day on Saturday & Sunday morning, and include almost non-stop music plus clogging, juggling, a puppet parade, flea circus, additional stories...and more!

Click to Enlarge


















Saturday evening features an open house on the skipjack Wilma Lee, and a traditional Ocracoke Island square dance, along with more music and storytelling.

The Ocracoke Festival showcases an outstanding collection of talent from the island, North Carolina, and elsewhere. What a great weekend! Hope to see you.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Recent Arrivals

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/02/2015 - 04:53
First there were mice and rats...brought to the island centuries ago as stowaways on sailing ships. I don't know how nutria got here, but I see them every once in a while. Then, sometime within the last 40 years, someone released a pair of minks. Next it was squirrels. What were these people thinking?

Deer are another recent arrival. They probably swam over here from Hatteras. I have seen two, just north of the NPS campground, and tracks are fairly common "down below" (anywhere north of the village).

Five years ago Gene Ballance sent me this photo of a raccoon foraging on his back porch. It was the first I had heard of raccoons on Ocracoke.
















Just last week Frankie Garrish told me he startled two raccoons who were feeding in the cat dishes in Cousin Blanche's yard.

There have been raccoons on Portsmouth Island for many years. I suppose a couple of them were washed over to Ocracoke during a storm. It is probably impossible, now, to get rid of them.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Detached Kitchens

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/01/2015 - 04:11
When I was a child my grandparents' house (the house I live in today) had a detached kitchen. By the time I was born a kitchen (with a newfangled kerosene cook stove) had been installed inside the house. The old kitchen was converted to a spare bedroom. Eventually, termites and water damage did so much damage that the kitchen was torn down.

To my knowledge, the only original detached kitchen still on the island is at Cousin Blanche's house. Actually, the porch has been extended to connect the two structures, and the old kitchen is now a storage area, but it still looks basically the way it did many years ago. Here are three photos I took earlier this month:

















Blanche told me she remembers when some islanders constructed outdoor temporary summer kitchens from saplings and tree branches. They would be used for just one season, then dismantled. But they served to keep the intense heat from the wood cook stove out of the main house.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Betimes

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:51
This is another old-time word that you can still occasionally hear around Ocracoke village.. betimes. It means "early."

Betimes seems to have become common in the 13th century in England, but it is seldom heard today.

Several days ago a reader mentioned the Thrush Green novels by Miss Read (Dora Saint). I have not yet read any of them, but I understand they are set in a small village in southern England, and I am told the author uses the word "betimes."

Also, you will find the word in 2 Chronicles 36:15, in the  King James Version of the Bible: "And the Lord God of their fathers sent to them by his messengers, rising up betimes, and sending; because he had compassion on his people, and on his dwelling place."

Rise up betimes, and take a stroll along the beach. You will probably experience a beautiful sunrise, and you might even find a scotch bonnet.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

One of the Most Mischievous and Vilest Villains

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 04:38
On 14 July, 1719, Capt. Ellis Brand of HMS Lyme penned a letter to the Lords of Admiralty. In it he referenced William Howard, quartermaster to Blackbeard the Pirate who many believe was the same William Howard who later became colonial owner of Ocracoke Island, as "one of the most mischievous, vilest villains that had infested that coast.” Author Kevin Duffus (Looking Glass Productions) photographed these two pages of the letter at the British Archives at Kew, and graciously offered to allow me to post them here.



















Here is my best transcription of the relevant passage:

I having on board my Ship a pyrate that I had some time before taking up which knew this fellow when he was Quartermaster in Tachs Ship of forty guns call’d the Queen Anns Revenge, and he being allow’d to be a good Evidence I did desire of the Governor that this Quartermaster might be brought to Tryal, which he concented to and there being publick Notice of it several appeared against him, and it was made appear to the Court that he was One of the Most Mischevious and Vileist Villians that had infested that coast; he was found guilty and receiv’d sentence of Death Accordingly and his life is only owing to the Ships Arrival that had his Majesties pardon on board, the night before he was to have been exicuted; ....

Ellis Brand 
In the interest of  providing some balance to the legacy of my probable ancestor, Kevin added this comment in his email to me: "I’m sure that William Howard was not so vile. Mischievous maybe, but not vile. At some point I hope to remember where I read that Howard had traveled to the Bahamas to testify on behalf of a physician forced into piracy by Blackbeard."
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The Curlicue

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 05/27/2015 - 04:20
As nearly everyone knows, Wilbur and Orville Wright, bicycle enthusiasts and remarkable innovators, accomplished the first controlled, powered, sustained heavier-than-air flight, on December 17, 1903, in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

The Wright brothers hailed from Dayton, Ohio, but traveled to the Outer Banks because the wind and terrain were more suitable for their flight experiments. You might think that soaring above the ground (even at just 10 feet of altitude) was a dangerous undertaking, but simply getting to Kitty Hawk in the first years of the 20th century was quite risky, as Wilbur's September, 1900, journal illustrates. A few excerpts:

"At 4:30 left for Eliz. City and put up at the Arlington where I spent several days waiting for a boat to Kitty Hawk. No one seemed to know anything about the place or how to get there. At last on Tuesday afternoon I engaged passage with Israel Perry on his fiat-bottom schooner fishing boat [the Curlicue]."

"The [skiff that took Wilbur to the fishing boat] leaked very badly and frequently dipped water, but by constant bailing we managed to reach the schooner in safety. The weather was very fine with a light west wind blowing. When I mounted the deck of the larger boat I discovered at a glance that it was in worse condition if possible than the skiff. The sails were rotten, the ropes badly worn and the rudderpost half rotted off, and the cabin so dirty and vermin-infested that I kept out of it from first to last."

"The boat was quite unfitted for sailing against a head wind owing to the large size of the cabin, the lack of load, and its flat bottom. The waves which were now running quite high struck the boat from below with a heavy shock and threw it back about as fast as it went forward. The leeway was greater than the headway. The strain of rolling and pitching sprung a leak and this, together with what water came over the bow at times, made it necessary to bail frequently."

"In a severe gust the foresail was blown loose from the boom and fluttered to leeward with a terrible roar. The boy and I finally succeeded in taking it in though it was rather dangerous work in the dark with the boat rolling so badly."

"[There was] another roaring of the canvas as the mainsail also tore loose from the boom, and shook fiercely in the gale. The only chance was to make a straight run over the bar under nothing but a jib, so we took in the mainsail and let the boat swing round stern to the wind. This was a very dangerous maneuver in such a sea but was in some way accomplished without capsizing."

You can read the entire journal entry here:  http://www.wright-brothers.org/History_Wing/Wright_Story/Inventing_the_Airplane/Off_on_Adventure/Off_on_Adventure.htm.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Exchange Students

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 04:46
Over the last 25 years Ocracoke School has had a number of foreign exchange students. They came to us from Japan, Germany, Denmark, Argentina, Thailand, and Columbia. Ocracoke Island students have studied in the Netherlands, Germany, France, Japan, Australia, Denmark, Romania, Austria, and Ghana.

Pictured below (from l. to r.), with former Ocracoke School teacher Karen Lovejoy (herself a high school exchange student to Germany) are four of our foreign exchange students: Amy Howard (Germany), Emma Lovejoy (Denmark & Ghana), Molly Lovejoy (Austria), and Caroline Temple (Romania).














When Emma was living and studying in Ghana she met Esuon.They fell in love, he recently moved to the US, and they are now planning a fall wedding. Last week the Karen Lovejoy/Dave Frum family welcomed Esuon to Ocracoke with an outdoor potluck dinner at their home.

Potluck at the Lovejoy/Frum Home

L. to R.: Karen, Dave, Esuon, Emma, & Molly

Emma & Esuon





































Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Ocracoke Art

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 05/25/2015 - 04:47
It is always fun to see plein air painters on Ocracoke. The other day I noticed a young artist on the corner of NC12 & British Cemetery Road (near the Harborside Motel). He was busily working on a painting of the two hexagonal buildings where Island Golf Carts and WOVV are located.















I stopped to chat for a few minutes. The artist was Mark Hunter Brown, a native North Carolinian who now lives in Chicago. In addition to showing his work in Chicago, Mark has also exhibited in Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, and Italy.

Here is a painting he made a couple of days ago, of the Wilma Lee.















You can see more of Mark's paintings, and read more about him, on his web site: http://markhunterbrown.com/home.html.

I also understand that Mark will be spending most of the summer on the island...and he will be playing William Howard in this year's production of A Tale of Blackbeard

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Firemen's Ball

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 05/22/2015 - 05:43
The tenth annual Ocracoke Firemen’s Ball will be held tomorrow, Saturday, May 23, at the Ocracoke Community Center.



















The event (the major fund raiser for the fire department) begins at 5 p.m. with a pig pickin’ followed by a silent and a live auction. The evening ends with live music by The Ocracoke Rockers, The Aaron Caswell Band, and The Dune Dogs.

Bidding for Great Items & to Support OVFD















This is the schedule of events:

5:00 – 6:30 Barbeque dinners @ $12.00 each
5:00 – 6:30 Silent auction (also, Firemen’s Ball t-shirts for sale)
7:00 Live Auction
8:30 -Midnight Music and Dancing

More information here and here

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

May Newsletter

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 04:58
We have just published our latest Ocracoke Newsletter, Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm. If you haven't read Part I, no worry. There is a link to Part I at the beginning of the article.

Enjoy!
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Friends of Portsmouth Island

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 05:18
The Friends of Portsmouth Island held their spring membership meeting Saturday, May 16, at the Ocracoke Community Center. Several dozen people attended. Many were able to trace their ancestry to historic Portsmouth Island families.

The meeting commenced after a delicious and nutritious brunch provided by various members. After the secretary's and treasurer's reports, James White presented a plaque to Ken Burke in recognition of his contributions to the history of Portsmouth.

James White & Kenneth Burke


















Ken Burke discovered Portsmouth in the 1950s, and immediately fell in love with the island, the village, and the people. In 1958 Ken wrote about Portsmouth as his honors thesis for a degree in history from the University of Richmond. It is titled The History of Portsmouth, North Carolina From Its Founding in 1753 to Its Evacuation in the Face of Federal Forces in 1861.

As James White explained, this was the first, and continues to be one of the most important documents chronicling the history of this unique island community. Ken Burke's text can be accessed on the web at  http://scholarship.richmond.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1410&context=honors-theses.

After the presentation, Glenn and Brenda White shared stories and photos documenting their time as National Park Service volunteers in Portsmouth Village.

The next Portsmouth Island Homecoming is scheduled for April 30, 2016. 

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article by island resident, Crystal Canterbury, about her very first visit to Portsmouth Village, on the last day of 2014. You can read Part I here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The Paraguay

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 05/19/2015 - 04:36
The 242' freighter, S. S. Paraguay, was built in 1900 to carry ore on the Great Lakes. Shortly thereafter, the Paraguay was converted to an oil tanker, plying the sea lanes in the North Atlantic Ocean. 

S.S. Paraguay, Courtesy M.W. Kates.(http://www.fleetsheet.com)












On December 4, 1927, the Paraguay (recently renamed the Kysikos) encountered a punishing gale off shore of the Outer Banks. While working the pumps in an effort to keep the embattled ship afloat, several crewmen were washed overboard by a huge wave. Early in the morning of the next day the Paraguay was driven ashore just north of Kitty Hawk. In spite of the weather, rescuers from the Kitty Hawk Life Saving Station managed to launch a life boat, and succeeded in rescuing the remaining 24 crew members.

While rehabilitating my house I discovered the following account of the Paraguay in a 1927 newspaper clipping laid down under the linoleum:

"Beachcomber Pays $100 for Wrecked ship And Expects to Realize $65,000 From It

"Underwriters of a Greek tank ship named Paraguay, which went ashore off Kitty hawk, N. C., during a storm on Dec. 4, have sold for $100 a property which is expected to yield the present owner more than $65,000.

"One of the beachcombers, who makes a practice of buying wrecks for such stores aboard as may be salvaged, paid $100 for the Paraguay. He took off wireless apparatus and stores worth $4,500 and sold the rest of the hulk to dealers in Norfolk, Va., for $1,500 or more.

"The wreck is laden with 800,000 gallons of fuel oil, and the beachcomber expects to sell this for $60,000. The former owners of the Paraguay lose nothing, since they were insured.

"Two men were lost off the Paraguay when she struck the beach. The tanker broke in half almost as soon as she hit, but the cargo section is intact and the oil still aboard. The salvager expects to have no trouble beaching the cargo."

According to Minor Kates, Jr. on his web site (http://www.fleetsheet.com/paraguay.htm), "the Kyzikos [the Paraguay] rests just offshore of Kill Devil Hills at Mile Marker 7. This site is very popular with scuba divers."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article by island resident, Crystal Canterbury, about her very first visit to Portsmouth Village, on the last day of 2014. You can read Part I here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Salt

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 05/18/2015 - 04:32
Amy loaned me her copy of Mark Kurlansky's 2002 book, Salt. It was fascinating to learn how important and valuable salt has been in the history of the world. And that got me to wondering...were there ever attempts to harvest or produce salt in eastern North Carolina? This is what I discovered in David Stick's book, The Outer Banks of North Carolina:
  • In September, 1775, the Provincial Congress offered a bounty of 750 pounds "to any person who shall erect and build proper works for Manufacturing common Salt on the sea shore."
  • Two ventures were begun in the Beaufort, NC, area, one designed to flood coastal areas and produce salt by solar evaporation, the other producing salt by boiling salt water in large vats.
  • Heavy rains thwarted one operation; the drowning of the operator terminated the other venture.
  • The wreck of the Success (sailing from Bermuda to North Carolina) in January, 1788, and loss of her cargo of salt, was of great concern because there had been an acute shortage of salt in North Carolina since the outbreak of the Revolutionary War.
  • In September, 1776, delegates from the North Carolina Council of Safety wrote to the delegates to the Congress in Philadelphia that, "It is impossible for us to describe the distressed Situation of this State for the want of Salt. The Inhabitants in general say only let them have that article and they will fight so long as they have Existence, in support of the just rights of their Country. Without it, themselves, Families and stocks must perish."
  • Benjamin Franklin then made available pamphlets on "making Salt by Sun Evaporation or by Culinary fire."
  • After this information was distributed on the Outer Banks, it was reported that "The Humour of Salt boiling seems to be taking place here....Every Old Wife is now scouring her pint pot for the necessary operation."
Salt was an important product that was used to cure fish and ham. Without it, eighteenth century Outer Banks sustenance and commerce was in serious jeopardy. Luckily, abundant salt water and Ben Franklin's pamphlet saved the day!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article by island resident, Crystal Canterbury, about her very first visit to Portsmouth Village, on the last day of 2014. You can read Part I here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042115.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Vacationers help needy families on the Outer Banks

Village Realty Blog - Mon, 07/20/2009 - 13:41
Saturday, July 18, 2009 BRBRBy Jennifer Preyss BRStaff Writer for The A href="http://www.dailyadvance.com/news/vacationers-help-needy-families-726249.html"Daily AdvanceBR/A DIV class=subheadline H3Pa. families give 2 families $1,400/H3BRWhen Currituck locals get the urge to complain about tourists this summer, they might want to consider what three families vacationing from Pennsylvania are doing to make life a little easier for the area’s neediest residents. BRBRFor the second year in a row, the Malagise family of Freedom, Pa., the O’Donnell family of West Mifflin, Pa., and the Wilson family of Bethel Park, Pa., have donated money to help an area family struggling to make ends meet. BRBRAccording to Ginger Candelora, executive director of Interfaith Community Outreach, the families were vacationing on the Outer Banks last summer when they discovered that behind the Outer Banks’ beautiful beaches and tourist attractions, there was a rising unemployment rate and hundreds of families in dire financial straits. BRBR“They were just talking one night around the pool and said, 'It’s hard to believe you’ve got so many poor people living in the middle of paradise,’” Candelora said. BRBRCandelora isn’t sure how the families learned about ICO, but they contacted her office and inquired about making a donation to local family in need. BRBR“They said they wanted to donate money, but they wanted to write the check themselves and give it to the person, rather than go through ICO,” Candelora said. “We don’t usually do that, so we found a Currituck lady who was in the hospital, she had contracted a virus, and was facing eviction from her home. We told (the families) they could write a check to her landlord.” BRBRThe vacationers agreed, and wrote a $400 check to the woman’s landlord. BRBRWhen the families returned for a vacation this summer in Duck, they again contacted ICO and inquired about making a donation to another family. This time, they wanted to donate an even larger sum: $1,000. BRBRAs Candelora went through her 44 faith outreach networks and the Departments of Social Services in Currituck and Dare, one family rose to the top as a perfect candidate for the donation. BRBRA young Dare County family was struggling to pay bills after the husband had lost his construction job. Their troubles mounted after his hours at a local restaurant — where he had found another job — were cut. BRBR“He finally found full-time work at Food Lion, but they were hurting with their finances and about one and one-half months behind in their rent,” Candelora said. BRBRInterfaith was familiar with the family because that’s what it does: helps needy families in Dare and Currituck counties by providing them with emergency services and funding. Since January, the ecumenical outreach program and its network of donors between Moyock and Hatteras have helped more than 500 families in the two counties. BRBRThe families left quietly about a week ago, and requested their donations remain anonymous. But Candelora, touched by their giving, begged them to go public. BRBR“They wanted to give anonymously, but we wanted to let folks see that our visitors care so much for our paradise,” Candelora said. “And they’re so young. I was impressed with that. It gives us hope."BRBRA href="http://www.dailyadvance.com/news/vacationers-help-needy-families-726249.html"Link to the ArticleBR/A/:OD/DIV
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Simple Pleasures on the Outer Banks

Village Realty Blog - Thu, 07/16/2009 - 13:00
BRBRIMG src="http://images.quickblogcast.com/41500-38006/SunsetonSoundBEAUTIFUL.jpg"BRBRSTRONGEMFONT face="Courier New" size=3Simple Pleasures of the Outer BanksBRBR/FONTSunsets BRBRSunrises with a great cup of coffee or teaBR/EM/STRONGBRSTRONGEMFresh, Sweet Corn with real butterBRBRPink Crepe Myrtles in downtown ManteoBRBRSmelling the Russian Olive Trees as you drive the road to CorollaBRBRCustard cone from Kill Devils BRBRPicking up lunch from Stop and Shop and eating it at the Avalon Pier parking lotBRBRDriving home with your car windows down on the beach road BRBRChilling on the porch during a rain stormBRBRThe baby rabbits you see in the yard BRBRHaving breakfast at Nags Head PierBRBRWhile you are in Corolla, you see some of the Corolla Wild HorsesBRBRThe new soundside park in DuckBRBRPelicans flying over the oceanBRBRCrossing the Wright Memorial Bridge after being out of town ...whether it is for an hour or a week /EM/STRONG
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs
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