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Stories

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 07/02/2015 - 04:53
Stories help bind a community together. And Ocracoke has always thrived on stories. The following quotation is included in Ann Ehringhaus' book, Ocracoke Portrait:

"I've heard some stories a hundred times at least, and there are some stories that are repeated every three or four weeks on the docks -- what so-and-so said at such-and-such a time. Some stories seem like they happened yesterday and I know that these people were dead before I was born." -- Al Scarborough.

Here is another one: "When you first move here, you hear somebody talking about something. They speak of it as if it was yesterday and it happened fifty years ago." -- Norman Miller

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.  


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Ocracoke and the Revolution

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 04:12
As we prepare to celebrate Independence Day, I thought our readers would enjoy reading this paragraph from the Pennsylvania Journal, dated Wednesday, June 4, 1777:

"May 9. The Brune, a frigate of 36 guns, and the Merlin, of 20 guns, two of his tyrannic Majesty’s ships of war, are now cruising on this coast, having lately taken nine vessels between Ocracock and Cape-Fear, where they put in to water, having on board a renagado [an archaic form of renegade] American pilot, who served his time in Cape Fear river. The prisoners say the ships are not half manned, and that they met with great insults and savage usage from the humane and polite English officers and seamen, and were stripped of their money and cloaths"

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Audio Tours Download

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 04:47
Last week I introduced OcracokeNavigator.com, a free, comprehensive and interactive Ocracoke Island mobile web app for use on your smart phone, tablet, or laptop browser.

A reader commented that he wished he could download the audio tours to his tablet so he could listen and follow them even though he does not have a smart phone. Stefen Howard, creator of the app, has taken this suggestion and added another page to his app. You can now click on this link to download all of the audio files: https://www.ocracokenavigator.com/audio-tours-download/.

Now you can listen to the audio tours on your device even if you do not have a smart phone, or when no Internet service is available. 

OcracokeNavigator is a great resource for a wealth of information about Ocracoke, a thorough introduction to Ocracoke for first-timers, a handy resource for frequent visitors, and a comprehensive guide to nearly every aspect of Ocracoke Island


This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

A Great Hand!

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 06:29
I play poker every Friday night. It is just a guys' night out, and the stakes are low (nickel, dime, quarter poker), but it is great fun. We've been playing regularly, usually at my house, for about 14 years.

Last Friday night Lou Ann had planned to spend the evening with her friend Ellen who had rented a cottage for two weeks. When Lou Ann came home for a few minutes after her Ghost Walk the heavens opened up with torrential rain, thunder, and lightening. We were in the kitchen drinking beer and playing poker.

Although Friday night poker is a guys only event, everyone at the table felt sorry for Lou Ann because the storm was keeping her from going to visit her friend. We all agreed to break our rule, and let her play "just this one evening."

Here is an un-staged photo of one of Lou Ann's winning hands:















This, of course, is a king-high straight flush. There is only one other natural poker hand that will beat this one...an ace-high straight flush. Congratulations, Lou Ann! It is going to take another thunder storm for us to let a woman play again!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Crab Pots, Again

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 04:48
I have often wondered why crab pots are called "pots." (See our post of two days ago for more information about crab pots.)  According to William Warner in his book, Beautiful Swimmers, very early devices for catching English shore crabs were willow and hazel stick baskets with a single funnel that looked much like a flower pot.

The modern crab pot used in America was invented in the 1930s in Virginia. It does not look like a pot at all, but still retains that name. Modern crab pots are light and airy, necessary attributes to attract and catch blue crabs that live in Pamlico Sound and the Chesapeake Bay.

According to North Carolina State University, "Currently, crab pots...are used in harvesting approximately 95% of total hard blue crabs in North Carolina. The huge jump from 30% crab pots used in the 1950s show that crab pots are more efficient and effective, and thus preferred method for the commercial fishery."

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

THE MAIL MUST GO…

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 06/25/2015 - 04:50
Thanks to Bruce Jarvah, frequent visitor to Ocracoke from Chocowinity, NC, who sent me this poem he wrote about the mailboat Aleta:

Oh the wind can blow down the Pamlico
Yes, the wind can blow down the Pamlico
But no matter what, the mail must go
To Ocracoke, to Ocracoke.

Down by the mill In Washington
They load the boat to Ocracoke
Out on the sound the sky is gray
And the waves are high,
But the mail must go, yes the mail must go.















Each day they cross the shallow sound
To Silver Lake the boat is bound
The wind does blow, the wind does blow
But to Ocracoke the mail must go.

On Ocracoke the mail arrives
Oft people wait with misty eyes
For news from friends or family,
The mail's arrived on Ocracoke!

Oh the wind can blow, 'cross the Pamlico
Yes the wind can blow 'cross the Pamlico
But the mail’s come in, yes the mail’s come in
And all is well on Ocracoke, all is well on Ocracoke.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Crab Pots

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 04:24
Passengers on ferries to Ocracoke often notice small buoys floating near the channels, but they don't always know that they are tethered to crab pots. A crab pot is a cubical cage made of steel wire (like chicken wire) with a cylindrical "bait box" in the center, four conical funnels (or "throats") at the bottom edges through which crabs enter, and two wider funnels inside the pot leading to an upper chamber, the "parlor," (crabs naturally swim upwards trying to escape) where they remain contained until the fisherman returns). A "cull ring" (visible in the bottom photo) allows smaller crabs to escape.






























To learn more about crabs and crab pots, click on this link: http://cmast.ncsu.edu/cmast-sites/synergy/bluecrab/bscrab.html.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Introducing...

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/23/2015 - 04:38
...A new, comprehensive and interactive Mobile Web App: Ocracoke Navigator!

Click to Enter




This free app (no download is required; simply type the address in your smart phone, tablet, or laptop browser) is a great resource for a wealth of information about Ocracoke. (In the spirit of full disclosure, this web app was designed and produced by my son, Stefen Howard, so I admit that I am a tad biased.)

Ocracoke Navigator is a thorough introduction to Ocracoke for first-timers, a handy resource for frequent visitors, and a comprehensive guide to nearly every aspect of Ocracoke Island.


Click for Ocracoke Island History













Ocracoke Navigator includes:
As Stefen says, "It's like having an Ocracoke native in your pocket!"

Take a look at Ocracoke Navigator today...and check back often. More information (about local businesses and island history) is being added regularly.


This month's Ocracoke Newsletter relates the story of the prohibition-era rum runner Messenger of Peace that brought much pleasure to the residents of Portsmouth. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

June Newsletter

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/22/2015 - 05:18
We have just published our latest Ocracoke Newsletter, the story of the grounding of the Prohibition-era rum runner, Messenger of Peace, at Ocracoke Inlet in August of 1921. An interview with Ocracoke native (and Portsmouth Island resident) Mattie Gilgo illustrates how delighted some folks were when this vessel fetched up here!

You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news062115.htm.

Also...an additional word about my latest book, Howard Street Hauntings: The book is available from Village Craftsmen on-line (www.villagecraftsmen.com/islandbooks.htm).  To display the most economical shipping costs (USPS Media Mail) when ordering on-line, choose "More Carriers" and "USPS Media Mail."

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Digby

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 04:48
In the mid-1950s Ruth and Latrobe Carroll spent several months living on Ocracoke. They were fascinated by the village & her people, but especially by the many cats on the island. Together they wrote and illustrated a children's book, Digby the Only Dog.

Digby is a loveable dog who makes friends with every animal, especially every cat, and person on the island.. He is the island's only dog, but when other dogs are brought to Ocracoke, they expect him to chase cats. Digby refuses, and earns the respect of the dogs, who agree to never chase a cat again.

Ruth Carroll illustrated the book with delightful images that captured the spirit of Ocracoke 60 years ago.

Illustration from Digby the Only Dog












Although much on Ocracoke has changed since the 1950s, much remains the same, as you can see from the photo of my grandson, Lachlan, below.


















I hope you can find a copy of Digby. It is a wonderful children's book!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Pirate Code

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 06/18/2015 - 05:13
The following Pirate Code was drawn up in 1721 by the mutinous crew of the merchantman Rover (later the Royal Fortune). The crew became pirates, and elected Bartholomew Roberts as their captain. This detailed document illustrates the generally democratic policies of pirate bands, and was quoted by Captain Charles Johnson in his 1724 book, A General History of the Robberies & Murders of the Most Notorious Pirates.

I. Every Man has a Vote in affairs of Moment, has equal Title to the fresh Provisions, or strong Liquors, at any Time seized, and may use them at pleasure, unless a Scarcity make it necessary, for the good of all, to Vote a Retrenchment.

II. Every Man to be called fairly in turn, by List, on Board of Prizes, because, (over and above their proper Share) they there on these Occasions allowed a Shift of Cloathes: But if they defrauded the Company to the Value of a Dollar in plate, Jewels, or Money, MAROONING was their punishment.

III. No Person to game at Cards or Dice for Money.

IV. The Lights and Candles to be put out at eight o'Clock at Night: if any of the Crew, after that Hour still remained inclined for Drinking, they were to do it on the open Deck.

V. To Keep their Piece, Pistols, and Cutlass clean and fit for Service.

VI. No Boy or Woman to be allowed amongst them. If any Man were to be found seducing any of the latter Sex, and carried her to Sea, disguised, he was to suffer Death.

VII. To Desert the Ship or their Quarters in Battle, was punished with Death or Marooning.

VIII. No striking one another on Board, but every Man's Quarrels to be ended on shore, at Sword and Pistol Thus: The Quarter-Master of the Ship, when the Parties will not come to any Reconciliation, accompanies them on Shore with what Assistance he thinks proper, and turns the Disputants Back to Back, at so many Paces Distance. At the Word of Command, they turn and fire immediately, (or else the Piece is knocked out of their Hands). If both miss, they come to their Cutlasses, and then he is declared the Victor who draws the first Blood.

IX. No Man to talk of breaking up their Way of Living, till each had shared £1000. If in order to this, any Man should lose a Limb, or become a Cripple in their Service, he was to have 800 Dollars, out of the public Stock, and for lesser Hurts, proportionately.

X. The Captain and Quarter-Master to receive two Shares of a Prize: the Master, Boatswain, and gunner, one Share and a half, and other Officers one and Quarter.

XI. The Musicians to have Rest on the Sabbath Day, but the other six Days and Nights, none without special Favour.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Crabs

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 04:46
Friends in the kitchen, newspaper spread on the table, beer, a bowl of melted butter...and steamed crabs: what better way to spend an Ocracoke Island evening?
















We enjoyed our first steamed crabs of this season after the Ocracoke Opry last Wednesday night. The picking was great!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Note in a Bottle

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/16/2015 - 04:44
Judi Heit, from Oriental, North Carolina, publishes a wonderful blog about shipwrecks in North Carolina.  In 2012 Judi wrote about a bottle containing a message that washed ashore at Shelby Bay, Bermuda, on October 27, 1842:

“Schooner Lexington, off Cape Hatteras, July 15, 1842. This morning at half past two o’clock a.m., it commenced blowing a strong North Wester, which increased to such a degree that it was certain my vessel could not stand it. At 5 I tried the pumps and found that she made eleven inches. She being an old vessel, worked in her joints. At half past eleven, I determined to leave her with my crew (three men and myself) in our launch; but before leaving sounded the pumps, and found she had increased the water in her hold three feet. I write this and enclose it in a bottle, so that if we should not be saved and the bottle be found, it may be known what became of the vessel and us. At 1 p.m. got into the boat with provisions and water sufficient for six days, having beforehand offered up our prayers to God to protect and save us. Signed Wm. H. Morgan, Captain ; John Rider, Mate.”

Several powerful hurricanes and storms struck the Outer Banks in July and August of 1842. Judi Heit (on her blog site) and Sonny Williamson (in his book, Shipwrecks of Ocracoke Island), document several vessels that were wrecked, with many lives lost (the Marie, the Ann Stille, the Eliza Marie, the Transport, the Henry Camerden, the Pioneer, the Granary, the Harrison, the John Hughes, the Kimberly, the John L. Durand, the Kilgore, and the Congress).  

Read Judi Heit's blog post for more information about the hurricanes of July 15, and August 24, 1842.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Ocracoke in the Ice Age

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 05:16
In 2007 I published a post (with photos) of an ancient jasper point that my neighbor, Edward Norvell, found on Ocracoke's beach. 














Although we were pretty sure the point was quite old, we are not trained anthropologists. Finally, after eight years, we have been able to contact a well-respected anthropologist whose specialty is the study of the Clovis Culture, a prehistoric, Paleo-Indian culture. We sent him photographs of the point, and this is what we discovered:

Although it is difficult to determine the provenance of an artifact only from photographs, the fact that the point has a flute on one side and a few flakes that go past the midline, plus a bevel on the opposite side from the flute, indicates that this is a Clovis "preform" (a not totally finished point, basically). In addition, it appears that some time later (there is no way to tell how much later) someone did further sharpening on the edges. In other words, someone began to make a Clovis point, got pretty far along, then abandoned the project. Then either she or someone else decided to sharpen it without finishing it up into a full Clovis point. The fact that it is not waterworn indicates it was buried under the sand offshore, then was dredged up and carried in during a storm. All of this suggests that  Clovis occupations were established near Ocracoke around 13,000 years before the present.

Earlier this year, I also published a blog post about a fossilized bison tooth that was found in the water near Springer's Point.














So, now we know that large mammals and Paleo-Indians were roaming these parts at the end of the last ice age, when sea levels were much lower and the coast of North Carolina was 70 to 80 miles farther seaward.

For more information, read Pat Garber's recent article in the Ocracoke Observer. Her article was written before we received the latest information about Edward Norvell's jasper point.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Williamsburg Public Gaol

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 06/12/2015 - 04:32
Not long ago my son-in-law, Fiddler Dave, was in Colonial Williamsburg with the Molasses Creek band. He visited the Public Gaol, and sent me a droll email with this subject line: "Your ancestors lodged here!"

Photo by David Tweedie













According to information on the web identifying southeastern Virginia highway markers, "[t]he Williamsburg Gaol was erected in 1701. It was a brick prison with the dimensions of thirty by twenty feet with two stories, and was used for both prisoners and the jailer with his family. In addition to the interior rooms, there was also a courtyard, which was enclosed by walls so as to prevent escape during the prisoners’ recreation time. It was known 'as a strong, sweet Prison' and would be used into the period of the Civil War and beyond then .... Another set of reputable prisoners, were the associates of the infamous pirate Blackbeard. They were all executed in 1718. This was Virginia's chief prison which housed debtors and criminals and served as the jail for the General Court in the nearby Captiol. Here Blackbeard's pirates, captured in 1718, were confined until the day of their hanging. Leg irons, an exercise yard, food slots, and criminal cells with primitive sanitation have been restored to their early appearance.

According the official history of Colonial Williamsburg, "Virginia's general assembly ordered a 'substanciall brick prison' built in Williamsburg soon after it decided to make the city the colony's new capital. Known as the Public Gaol, the building's construction was authorized by an act of August 1701.... The Public Gaol's most celebrated occupants were 15 henchmen of the pirate Blackbeard, caught in 1718.... [T]he air [was described as] truly Mephytic.... [T]he Public Gaol was a place of discomfort and pestilence. Gaol fever – probably typhus – broke out from time to time, and the unheated cells often were overcrowded.... Manacles and chains were familiar parts of gaol life.... Strong timbers were laid beneath the cells to prevent 'under mining.'"

William Howard, quartermaster to Blackbeard the Pirate, and probable early owner of Ocracoke Island, was confined to the Public Gaol in 1718, and remained there into the fall, so he was not among Blackbeard's crew when his captain was captured and killed on November 22 by sailors of the Royal Navy under the command of Lt. Robert Maynard.

Howard was tried and sentenced to be hanged, but King George's pardon (The Act of Grace) was delivered to Williamsburg the day before his scheduled execution, so the quartermaster was released. My ancestor may have lodged at the gaol, but he died three quarters of a century later on Ocracoke Island.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Howard Street Hauntings

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 06/11/2015 - 04:21
News Flash!!

My new book, Howard Street Hauntings, has just been published.


















This is a sequel to my first book, Digging up Uncle Evans, which was based on our popular "Down Point" Ghost & History Walking Tour. The current volume, Howard Street Hauntings, is based on our "Around Creek" Ghost & History Walking Tour.

Howard Street Hauntings includes the stories of Old Diver (the unfortunate sailor whose ghost prowls graveyards on British Cemetery Road), Mad Mag (a long-dead housewife whose peculiar ways continue to frighten islanders), and Frank Treat Fulcher (a salty old sailor who became a Methodist preacher). You can also read about the woman who kept her casket in her parlor for seven years, the ghost ship of the Outer Banks, the suspended casket, and the phantom freighter, as well as tales from WWII, a recipe for Ocracoke Island meal wine, dramatic accounts of rescues by the United States Life-Saving Service, and more.

Howard Street Hauntings is available at Village Craftsmen, other Ocracoke Island stores, and on line at http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/islandbooks.htm#Hauntings. Also, on that same page, you can order Digging up Uncle Evans, or the two-book set.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Change

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 06/10/2015 - 04:37
On March 25 of this year I published a blog about pilot and photographer, Garrett Fisher and his spectacular aerial photos of the Outer Banks.

Garrett has just published a book of his photos, Sea of Change, Flying the Outer Banks. The book is available for purchase on line, and he hopes to have them in stores on Ocracoke this summer.

















In his book, Fisher observes that "the essence of the Outer Banks is change.... Sand, surf, and sky are in a constantly rhythmic state of change.... Every single time I flew, the sand, ocean, currents, inlets, and sky looked different, [and] it was a matter of wholesale surprises each time...."

Sea of Change shows the Outer Banks as "more beautiful than most of us realize" and introduces us to aspects of these islands "that people do not know..., showing these unknown and poorly accessed areas in ways that are difficult if not impossible to see on the ground."

Garrett Fisher's book is a beautiful contribution to our understanding and appreciation of this fragile string of islands some of us call home.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Handwriting

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 04:48
On May 28 I wrote a blog post that included Kevin Duffus' photograph of a letter written in 1719.

Photo by Kevin Duffus

















A reader commented on the lovely handwriting. And that reminded me of my great-grandfather's nineteenth century shipwreck reports. James Howard's penmanship is not as beautiful as Ellis Brand's, and his spelling and grammar are unconventional by today's standards (spide, redeness, flud, etc.), but his handwriting was superior to most of ours today.   

Capt. James W. Howard's Report

















What a difference a few generations make! I seldom write letters, and my handwriting is a blend of printing and cursive. School children today are not even taught penmanship or cursive writing. All the more reason to treasure these letters and reports from the past.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Recitals

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 06/08/2015 - 04:44
Not long ago I was sitting on the pizer with Cousin Blanche. I can't remember what we were chatting about, but something reminded Blanche of a song from her youth (Blanche is 95 year old). She began to recite the lyrics of  "A Good Man is Hard to Find." (I did some research afterwards and discovered this song was composed and performed by Eddie Green during the time of piano rolls (1918). The song became a classic Blues standard, and was performed by Bessie Smith, Sophie Tucker, Frank Sinatra, and Brenda Lee. Flannery O'Connor wrote a short story with the same title in 1955.

Blanche recited the song flawlessly:

A good man is hard to find,
You always get the other kind
Just when you think that he's your pal,
You look for him and find him fooling around with some other gal
Then you rave, you even pray,
To see him lying in his grave.
So if your man is nice,
You better take my advice:
Hug him in the morning,
Kiss him every night,
Give him plenty of loving,
Treat him right
'Cause a good man nowadays is hard to find

When Blanche was finished with "A Good Man is Hard to Find" she was reminded of another song from her era, a hymn titled "A Perfect Day" written in 1909 by Carrie Jacobs-Bond (1862-1946). She recited that song for me also:

When you come to the end of a perfect day,
And you sit alone with your thought,
While the chimes ring out with a carol gay,
For the joy that the day has brought,
Do you think what the end of a perfect day
Can mean to a tired heart,
When the sun goes down with a flaming ray,
And the dear hearts have to part?
Well, this is the end of a perfect day,
Near the end of a journey, too,
But it leaves a thought that is big and strong,
With a wish that is kind and true.
For mem'ry has painted this perfect day
With colors that never fade,
And we find at the end of a perfect day,
The soul of a friend we've made.
But Blanche was just getting started. Next she began singing (not just reciting) "The Sidewalks of New York."

That reminded her of "A Bicycle Built for Two." I listened reverently as sweet melodies wafted down the sandy lane.

The song was over much too soon, but, alas, it was time for me to depart. Reluctantly, I arose, thanked her for the impromptu performance, and assured her I'd be back again before long.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Festival Kickoff

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 06/05/2015 - 05:21
Tonight, from 4 - 5 pm participants in Donald Davis' Storytelling Workshop will be sharing stories at Deepwater Theater.

From 5 - 7, at the Ocracoke Preservation Society Museum property, the Pony Island Restaurant will be providing fresh, locally caught fried fish and grilled chicken dinners for $15 a plate.

Between 6 & 7pm, at Berkley Manor, you can listen to Mahalo Jazz 2 (Alison Weiner on piano, vocals, and melodica) and Robbie Link (upright bass), two eclectic musicians coming together to have their delightful way with jazz standards and original tunes.


















While there, you can also place silent bids on a wonderful assortment of fine art pieces donated by islanders and festival participants. 

Be sure to stick around for the live auction which starts at 7 o'clock. Afterwards head over to the Live Oak Stage (at Books to be Red) for a World Music Jam at 9 o'clock...then to the Community Center for the Donald Thompson Blues Band (and cash bar) at 10 pm.

Of course, the rest of the weekend is filled with more music, arts & crafts, dance, and other creative events. I will be taking it all in, and will be back Monday morning!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is Part II of Crystal Canterbury's account of her first visit to Portsmouth Island. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news052115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs
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