Ocracoke Island Journal

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An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3440125
Updated: 9 hours 54 min ago

Spider in the Shower

Wed, 05/14/2014 - 04:08
Lately I've had a tiny creature accompanying me in my outdoor shower. At first I didn't notice him; then when I turned to dry off I saw the web glistening in the morning light.

Follow Directions on Right to Enlarge


















I'm not sure how long he intends to stick around, but I'm careful not to disturb him. As long as the rest of his family doesn't move in with him I am happy to share the space.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

USLHE Line Post

Tue, 05/13/2014 - 04:38
On your next visit to the Ocracoke light house, keep your eyes open for the line marker.




















The marker has the letters, US LHE carved on it. The line post is on the edge of the marshy area a short distance from the end of the boardwalk. The letters stand for United States Light House Establishment.

The U.S. Light House Establishment was created by the First Congress in 1789 to manage the twelve colonial lighthouses that were put under the care of the federal government. The Light House Establishment was also empowered to oversee construction of new lighthouses.

Ocracoke light house was built in 1823, and is the oldest operating light house in North Carolina.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Blue Bloods

Mon, 05/12/2014 - 04:24
According to Ronald G. Hellman and Janis A. Roze, in their paper, The Resilient Horseshoe Crab: Guardian of Time, "On one of his expeditions to the New World, Sir Walter Raleigh came across strange creatures on the coast of North Carolina, and named them ‘horseshoe crabs’" (http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart/0102/rhsc/page.htm).















Horseshoe crabs (in spite of their name, these creatures are marine arthropods, not true crabs) spawn in the spring. According to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, "Spawning usually coincides with the high tide during the full and new moon. Breeding activity is consistently higher during the full moon than the new moon and is also greater during the night."

Although Delaware Bay hosts the largest spawning population of horseshoe crabs in the world, North Carolina has its fair share of these "creatures from the past."

The April 14, 2014 issue of The New Yorker has an informative article titled Blue Bloods about horseshoe crabs. The author, Ian Frazier, writes, "Horseshoe-crab blood is blue. I had never seen it before; unless the heart is pierced, the structure of the animal's anatomy generally keeps it from serious bleeding. The blue comes from hemocyanin, a copper-containing protein that transports oxygen in the blood, like the iron-containing hemoglobin in red blood."

Fascinating creatures, these horseshoe crabs! Take a few moments to appreciate these amazing animals the next time you spy one washed up on the beach...or encounter one in Pamlico Sound.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Onions

Sun, 05/11/2014 - 05:08
Look at vintage photos of Ocracoke yards, and you will see well-tended gardens. Nearly every house had a garden. Many also had chickens...and several had pigs. It was the custom years ago for houses to have two fences around their property. The outer fence kept the wild horses from tromping through the yard, and the inner fence kept the chickens away from the garden.

Nowadays there aren't quite as many vegetables grown on the island, but you will still see a number of beautiful, well kept gardens throughout the village.

A few days ago Michael brought a fistful of fresh onions for Amy & David. The aroma was heavenly!



















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Clamming

Sat, 05/10/2014 - 04:09
Spring is here...the water in the Sound is warming up...and clamming season is upon us. All you need is a clam rake, a clam basket, and access to the clam beds!



Last month I shared information about Marcus Lawson and his new venture -- Clam Digger, Flounder Gigger Charters. Check out his web site for more information: https://www.facebook.com/clamdigger.floundergigger.

Clamming is a great way to experience the tranquility of a few hours in Pamlico Sound...and to gather supper for you and your family.

You can contact Marcus at clamdiggerfloundergigger@gmail.com or by phone at 252-921-0279.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Shards

Fri, 05/09/2014 - 06:57
Lately I have noticed certain areas of the beach covered with pieces of broken seashells.This photo may not look terribly impressive, but I find it fascinating that ocean currents deposit so many shards in one location, and, just a few steps away, hardly any.


















If I had the time and talent, I would consider fashioning a mosaic from these shell fragments. As it is, I will simply enjoy nature's art work.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

British Cemetery

Thu, 05/08/2014 - 05:10
Tomorrow, May 9, at 11:00 am visitors will join island residents, representatives of the British and Canadian embassies, US Coast Guard dignitaries, Ocracoke school students, and others to remember those who gave their lives as they patrolled and protected the east coast of the United States during WWII.

Specifically remembered will be the crew of the British armed trawler, Bedfordshire which was torpedoed May 11, 1942. Four of the crew members are buried on Ocracoke.

British Cemetery, 1942
















You can read more about the British Cemetery here: http://www.outerbanks.com/british-cemeteries.html.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Stone Statues?

Wed, 05/07/2014 - 05:02
Several days ago I shared a story from a book written in 1895, The 48th in the War, Being a Narrative of the Campaigns of the 48th Regiment, Infantry, Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, During the War of the Rebellion.

The author, Oliver Christian Bosbyshell, describes his experiences on Hatteras Island. Below are his observations about burials on the Outer Banks.

"Directly opposite the [Methodist] meeting house is an old graveyard, wherein reposes the dust (if it is dust) of the ancient Hatterasins ; a lonely old place, with some curious inscriptions on its tombstones.

"Here’s one as a sample.

"In memory of Thos. Austin.
Died 1845. Aged 70 years.

"Thos. Austin. Was. His. Name.
Heaven. I. Hope. His. Station.
Hatteras. Was. His. Dwelling. Place.
And. Christ. Was. His. Salvation.
Now. He. Is. Dead. And. Buried.
All. His. Bones. Are. Rotten.
Remember. Him. When. This. You. See.
Least. He. Should. Be. Forgotten.

"The author of that epitaph was not familiar with the peculiar virtues of that old burying ground. Thomas, rest in peace; your bones are not all rotten, old boy—oh, no; listen! Diehl, of Company G, was buried in this graveyard. The authorities refused permission to send his body home.

"It is not the mere burying that makes the soldier’s funeral so inexpressibly solemn, it is the thought that there is no one near to mourn for him; none but the moaning wind and the ever roaring surf. It was a doleful funeral, tramping through the sand, up the island to this old graveyard. Digging the grave was not difficult. It was tedious to make it as deep as it should be. Two feet below the surface developed water, and the balance of the depth attained was through a constantly increasing volume of water. The coffin was lowered into the grave, and by the aid of sticks was pushed down under the water and held there until a sufficient quantity of the wet, sandy soil had been thrown upon it to prevent it from floating.

"Diehl was buried in December. The following May his body was disinterred, placed in a lead coffin, and sent North. But what a metamorphosis had taken place in the short time it had lain in this old graveyard. Through some chemical action the work of petrifaction had begun, the forehead had already turned to stone. A longer stay in the grave would have undoubtedly completed the change. This incident causes doubt as to the 'dust' of the old Hatteras folks reposing in this out-of-the-way graveyard, probably they are all stone statues, as it were. Had it been supposed that this was the case with the bodies silently resting here it would not have been remarkable, judging from the known tendency of some of the sojourners on Hatteras for practical jokes, to have discovered, on most any bright morning, all the old worthies unearthed from their salt, sandy, wet bed, and standing up as guardians over the places so long occupied by them."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of traveling to the island on Frazier Peele's ferry in 1951. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs