Ocracoke Island Journal

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An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3293125
Updated: 1 day 12 hours ago

Bridge over the Gut

Sun, 01/12/2014 - 05:48
Prior to World War II two small tidal streams flowed from Cockle Creek (later renamed Silver Lake) toward the "bald beach." These streams, or "guts" as they were known by islanders, divided the village into two major areas, Around Creek (including the Community Store, Howard Street, etc.) and Down Point (from the southern side of the Island Inn to the lighthouse and in that general vicinity).

Several primitive wooden bridges spanned the guts. I discovered this never-before-published photo after my father died. It was probably taken in the 1930s.












From left to right (back to front), to the best of my knowledge: Juliana Guth (my mother's mother), Kunigunde Guth Howard (my mother), Helena Guth Webster (my mother's sister), Lawton Howard (my father), and an unknown man.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Art Show & Silent Auction

Sat, 01/11/2014 - 05:34
Here is your opportunity to own an original Ocracoke work of art. On Jan. 25, 2014 the Ocracoke Preservation Society will be hosting an art show and silent auction titled, "Ocracoke, Through Your Eyes." 

Nearly 100 artists have received canvases (all 6" x 8") with which to be creative. Here are three examples:

Artist: Nancy Carlson
Artist: John Simpson
Artist: Pat Schweninger










































More canvases can be viewed on line at https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.616651635038927.1073741838.109598372410925&type=1

OPS will be accepting remote bids (explanation of that will come soon) and will mail the canvases if you win. 

 Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Motor Lifeboat

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 05:37
Last fall the Hatteras Inlet Coast Guard Station's 47 foot motor lifeboat was tied up at the National Park Service docks here at Ocracoke...and the crew welcomed visitors aboard.

Hatteras Inlet 47 Footer
A Peak Inside the Pilot House






























This very sophisticated vessel is built from marine grade aluminum, and is designed to right itself in fewer than ten seconds if it capsizes.

Many thanks to all of the men and women of the United States Coast Guard for their presence and dedication to duty protecting our shores and our coastal communities.

You can read more about this impressive vessel here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/47-foot_Motor_Lifeboat.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The Winter of 1917-1918

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 06:00
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The bitter cold of the last few days brings to mind stories of the severe winter of 1917-1918 when much of Pamlico Sound was frozen solid. 

Capt. Joe Burrus (he built the building that is now "Oscar's House B & B" on NC 12) was stationed on the screw-pile lighthouse at Bluff Shoal, about seven and one half miles from Ocracoke.  According to old timers the cold lasted so long that for several weeks no supply boats could reach the light station on Bluff Shoal. 

Eventually Captain Joe ventured out onto the ice and walked quite a distance.  Whether he was attempting to walk all the way to dry land, or just trying to relieve the boredom, is uncertain.  At any rate he turned back and remained at the lighthouse until the weather broke and food and supplies were finally delivered to him. 
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 When the supply boat finally made contact with Captain Joe the seaman reported that the lighthouse keeper had run out of food.  Of much more concern to Captain Burrus, however, was the fact that he had used up his supply of chewing tobacco.  Maybe that's what he was after when he stepped out onto the ice that cold winter day. We’re told he had resorted to chewing boat caulking before the supply boat arrived.

For more stories of the Big Freeze of 1917-1918 follow this link to a superb story in Our State magazine by Bryan Mims:  http://www.ourstate.com/big-freeze/#.UszEQT2FAh0.facebook

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Portsmouth Island Gallery

Wed, 01/08/2014 - 05:36
Last week Lou Ann and I accompanied folks to Portsmouth Island for the annual Christmas Bird Count. We aren't serious birders...and we didn't count any birds...but we did help Dave Frum rescue a Carolina Wren that was trapped in the Methodist Church. And later in the afternoon, back on Ocracoke, we helped locate the snowy owl that was hanging out at the South Point.

Lou Ann and I mostly spent our time wandering around Portsmouth village. Below are a few photos I took. It was a sunny day with the temperature in the low 50s...and no mosquitoes! It was perfect.

Henry Pigott's House
Approaching the Village
Inside the Washington Roberts House
Lath & Plaster
Early 1800s Graves
The Dennis Mason House
The Methodist Church
A Carpet of Lichens
The Schoolhouse






































































































































Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Pelicans

Tue, 01/07/2014 - 05:46
In the early 1970s there were only a few nesting pelicans on the Outer Banks. The widespread use of DDT had caused pelican egg shells to grow unnaturally thin, and the embryos did not develop to maturity. Once DDT was banned in 1972 the brown pelican made a dramatic comeback. Today hundreds (probably thousands) of these birds can be seen in coastal North Carolina. This photo was taken from the deck of the Cedar Island ferry in October, 2013. These birds congregate on the spoil island near the channel that passes by the sunken dredge Lehigh. Click on the photo (and follow directions to the right) to view a larger, better quality image.














Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

We're Back!

Mon, 01/06/2014 - 05:14
We hope all of our readers had a joyous holiday season...and that 2014 will be the best year ever. It is good to be back sharing news of Ocracoke Island.

Lou Ann was on the island from Christmas Eve until just a couple of days ago. We enjoyed Christmas festivities, visits with family & friends, a boat trip to Portsmouth Island, and daily excursions to the beach. One highlight of the last week was the arrival of a beautiful snowy owl on the island. You can see one of Peter Vankevich's spectacular photos of this rare visitor on our January 1 Facebook page.

Peter also sent me a photo of a Peregrine Falcon that was spotted on Ocracoke:


















We will be here again tomorrow with more news, stories, and photos of life on Ocracoke, so come back often.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs