Ocracoke Island Journal

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An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3412125
Updated: 10 hours 34 min ago

Burying the Dead

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 04:40
In his book, Paradise Lost, An Oral History of Portsmouth Island, James E. White, III has this to say about island burials:

"Lionel Gilgo [1915-1983] lived on the Island long enough to see and experience numerous burials on the Island first hand. 'At low tide, the water was about two and a half feet deep when you dig. Now here on this hill you might dig three feet. Up around the cemetery you can't go over three feet. If you do, you're going to come to water. We had to bury them and stand on the casket.'"

Portsmouth Island Graves















Lionel Gilgo goes on the say about one burial that "Four of us had to stand on the casket to keep it down in the hole until we don't get enough sand piled on top of it to hold it down. And then it washed out partially.... That's another thing that caused some people to leave here. They detested that. They didn't want to be buried in that water."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Leonard Bryant, 1960

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 04:53
The following notice was published in the Raleigh News & Observer, November 22, 1960:

White Friends Hold Last Rites for Negro Man

Ocracoke -- Leonard Bryant, 82, a member of the only Negro family on Ocracoke, died last week.

Funeral services were conducted Nov. 16 in the Methodist Church, of which he had been a member and sexton for many years. Since there is no segregation in the church, he had taken communion with the white members during that time. All pallbearers at the funeral were white.

He was buried in the unsegregated community cemetery.

Bryant came to Ocracoke at the age of 19 to help the late George Credle run the old Ponder Hotel. He lived alone in a home adjacent to that of other members of his family; his wife, who has been ill, has been living with a daughter in Winston-Salem.

Survivors include a son, Julius, and two daughters, Mildred and Muse Bryant, all of Ocracoke, and other children, in addition to his wife.

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Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.



Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The Sound of Sound

Mon, 04/14/2014 - 04:23
Walt Wolfram and Natalie Schilling-Estes, in their book Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks, have this to say about the sound of "sound":

"Despite the fact that the hoi toide sound seems to capture everyone's attention when they talk about the [Ocracoke Island] brogue, there are a number of other distinctive vowel sounds that more subtly act to set the brogue apart from other dialects of American English. One of these is the Ocracoke pronunciation of ow, as in town or sound, as more of an ay as in say, so that town sounds like tain and sound like saind."

They go on to say that "what we hear in these words isn't exactly an ay, just as what we hear in i-words isn't really oy. Rather the Ocracoke ow is actually two sounds spoken quickly together, just like the i sound. To pronounce the ow like an islander, you need to say eh as in bet, followed by ee as in beet. Thus sound comes out sounding like s-eh-ee-nd...-- almost like saind,...but not quite."

Wolfram and Shilling-Estes conclude that "The ow sound provides us with direct evidence that Ocracoke English is not the language of Shakespeare -- but it's certainly not the language of mainland America, either."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Coal

Sun, 04/13/2014 - 04:59
Every now and again a lump of coal washes up on the beach at Ocracoke. If you find some you might wonder where it came from.















Most likely the coal was originally cargo or fuel on a schooner or steamboat that wrecked offshore. The steamboat Home was a coal-fired vessel that wrecked in 1837. The George W. Wells was a collier, and one of the largest schooners ever built. She wrecked in 1913.

A lump of coal may not seem very interesting, but it is a reminder of a grand seafaring tradition, tragedy offshore, and the bravery and courage of members of the US Life Saving Service.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Clam Digger, Flounder Gigger

Sat, 04/12/2014 - 05:08
Native islander, Marcus Lawson, has started a new enterprise on Ocracoke.

Called "Clam Digger Flounder Gigger," this is a great way for visitors to experience Ocracoke Island. It is authentic, definitely not a typical tourist offering.








This is how Marcus describes his venture on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/clamdigger.floundergigger):

"While visiting Ocracoke Island, North Carolina, signing up for an excursion with Clam Digger & Flounder Gigger Charters can be a great way to explore the surrounding waters.

"Get to know the Pamlico Sound on a 24 foot Carolina Skiff, complete with all the equipment you will need to gather clams and to gig flounder. Then you can enjoy fresh local seafood and boast of your fishing skills.

"Call for reservations (252-921-0279) and further information on the fun you and your family can have."

You can also contact Marcus at clamdiggerfloundergigger@gmail.com.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.

 
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Willys Station Wagon

Fri, 04/11/2014 - 04:26
For years I have wanted a Willys station wagon. It is unlikely that I will ever get one. Recently, as I was looking through vintage Ocracoke Island photos I realized how many of these trucks are in the old pictures. Of course, they were the perfect vehicle for managing the island's sandy lanes.

This is the old store, Big Ike's Store. It stood where Captain's Landing is today. It was also the Post Office. The truck belonged to Carlton Kelly who lived in the large house with the widow's walk that backs up to Howard Street.




















If I can't own one of these vehicles, at least I can relive childhood memories every time I look at these old pictures.

Out latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Crazy Guy on a Bike

Thu, 04/10/2014 - 05:02
The people you meet on Ocracoke!

My son-in-law, Fiddler David, was on tour with Molasses Creek recently. He returned home Monday on the Cedar Island ferry. Crossing the sound, David met Mark, a 49 year old cyclist from Germany who has been on the road for three years. We invited Mark for supper Monday night & Tuesday night. What an interesting guy.

Mark with his "naked" bike

















Mark worked at a VW plant back in Germany. One day he just decided that the sedentary life was not for him. So he got on his bike and started pedaling. I am not sure about everywhere he has been, but he told stories about Europe, New Zealand, and the United States. Mark has covered more than 21,000 miles on his bicycle.

Mark has no long-range goal. He simply decides as he travels. I joked that he was like Yogi Berra who said, "When you come to a fork in the road, take it."

Mark posted this 7:43 minute video on his website (www.crazyguyonabike.com/mid):



Mark is something of a philosopher. We talked about freedom...the freedom of biking around the world without an itinerary...and the freedom of the settled life (not worrying about finding a place to sleep every night).

He posted this quotation by Victor Frankl on his website:

"The more a person concerns himself with pleasure, the more it recedes.
The more he pursues happiness, the more it eludes him.
To understand this, we have to overcome the popular misconception that happiness is one of man's Basic wants.
What he actually wants is a cause that allows him to be happy. Once a cause has been established,
the feeling of happiness will appear of its own accord. To the extent, however,
that man aims at happiness directly, he loses sight of established cause,
and the feeling of happiness will collapse in itself. In other words, happiness is a by-product
and cannot be approached directly".
-Victor Frankl-

Here is the original quotation, auf Deutsch:

"Je mehr er [der Mensch] nach Glück jagt, um so mehr verjagt er es auch schon.
Um dies zu verstehen, brauchen wir nur das Vorurteil zu überwinden,
daß der Mensch im Grund darauf aus sei, glücklich zu sein;
was er in Wirklichkeit will, ist nämlich, einen Grund dazu zu haben.
Und hat er einmal einen Grund dazu, dann stellt sich das Glücksgefühl
von selbst ein. In dem Maße hingegen, in dem er das Glücksgefühl direkt anpeilt,
verliert er den Grund, den er dazu haben mag, aus den Augen,
und das Glücksgefühl selbst sackt in sich zusammen.
Mit anderen Wort, Glück muß er-folgen und kann nicht er-zielt werden".

Mark left the island this morning. Happy Trails!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs