Ocracoke Island Journal

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An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3405125
Updated: 1 day 4 hours ago

Oregon Inlet

Wed, 04/09/2014 - 05:09
Oregon? Inlet...what does the inlet between the Nags Head peninsula and  Hatteras Island have to do with Oregon?

The Territory of Oregon existed from 1848 until it was admitted to the Union and became the state of Oregon in 1859.

Oregon Inlet was opened by a violent hurricane in 1846, two years before the Territory of Oregon was established, and 13 years before Oregon became a state.

According to Roger E. Kammerer, in Recollections of Pitt County, "In [1846*], a number of businessmen in Edgecombe County purchased a steamer in Baltimore, the Oregon, to run as a passenger and freight boat between Tarboro and Washington. It was the first vessel to use a new inlet cut by a hurricane in [1846*], known as Oregon Inlet. The Oregon ran on the Tar and Roanoke Rivers until it failed early as a financial venture and was sold at public auction in Washington, North Carolina on October 6, 1849. It was used later as a freight and excursion boat to Hyde County and Ocracoke. (p. 31)"

*Kammerer writes 1848, but the inlet opened in 1846.

David Stick, in his book The Outer Banks of North Carolina, identifies the vessel as "the side-wheeler Oregon, owned by William H. Willard."

After a brief search of the Internet I discovered that no one seems to know the origin or the word "Oregon," and I was unable to learn why Mr. Willard named his steamship the Oregon.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The Five Harmaniacs

Tue, 04/08/2014 - 04:21
Ocracoke Island natives, Walter and Edgar Howard, made a name for themselves on the vaudeville stage in New York and other cities. Edgar played banjo, and Walter played guitar, harmonica, jug, ukulele and washboard. Walter was also a vocalist.

The following clipping (courtesy Walter Howard, Jr.) was from 1926, when Walter was a member of the cowboy band, "The Five Harmaniacs."

















The caption under the photo reads "Above are some of the special artists who will take part in the 'Loew Midnight Frolic' Monday night from station WBRC [Birmingham, Alabama]. They are top, the Five Harmaniacs and bottom two funsters from the Batcheler-Jamieson Revue. These numbers with other Loew artists will make up the feature for the special program."

Walter Howard is on the right. The other members of his band were Jerry Adams, Wayne Durand, Ned Nestor, and Clyde Shugart.

You can read more about the Five Harmaniacs here: http://www.redhotjazz.com/5harmaniacs.html.

Out latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Boston Globe Article

Mon, 04/07/2014 - 05:09
Amy just sent me a link to an article that was published in the Boston Globe two days ago.

The article, titled "Ocracoke Island Tends to Tourists, Bows to History," was written by Diane Daniel.

Miss Daniel has this to say about the Village Craftsmen: "Had I not followed signs to the splendid Village Craftsmen, one of several high-quality shops selling artisans’ wares, I wouldn’t have discovered Howard Street. Just off the main road around the harbor, the half-mile sandy lane shaded with live oaks passes some of the village’s oldest houses, from the 1800s."

Later in the article the author stops by the Ocracoke Preservation Museum and chats with Amy. She also visits the Ocracoke Seafood Company, bikes around the village, kayaks in the Sound, and strolls down to Springer's Point. You can read the article here: http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2014/04/05/memorable-encounters-ocracoke-island/W3N1Bz0FfX2QBLM3pKtr5I/story.html.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Raleigh

Sun, 04/06/2014 - 04:32
This is a portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh. I can't imagine being so bedecked...even for a sitting for an artist.




















I've been told that the elaborate Elizabethan collars were as much practical as decorative. Someone said they were designed to deflect lice. When a louse fell out of one's hair, it landed in the folds of the collar and rolled out, away from the body. That could be true. Do any of our readers know?

Out latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Roots

Sat, 04/05/2014 - 04:48
I recently finished reading Whisper of the River by Ferrol Sams. This southern novel is an entertaining romp through the college career of young Porter ("Sambo") Osbourne, Jr. Sambo is quite the prankster, but he is intelligent, and has been Raised Right. Through luck and cunning, this young, naive country boy manages to make his four years at Willingham College in Macon a rollicking adventure, and in the process grow up.

Late in the book Sambo has a father/son conversation. Talk turns to "home," their insular, rural community in the fictional county of Brewton, far removed from the big city. Sambo's daddy opines that he would "never be able to live happily in a place where I didn't recognize every name on all the tombstones and know which ones were mine."

Wooden Marker for Tilmon W. O'Neal
















Tombstone for Failing Howard



















Many folks on Ocracoke can identify with Mr. Osbourne.

Out latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Where Are They Now?

Fri, 04/04/2014 - 05:00
On April Fool's morning I sat down at my computer to see if I had any comments on my post about drone lifeguards. After I was finished reading I raised my eyes and glanced out my window. I saw the top of a head at the base of my front steps.

This is what I saw when I opened my door.















My new friends remained in my yard all day, but they mysteriously wandered off during the night. I am told they paid a visit to Kenny Ballance. By morning they had found their way to the coffee shop, but rumor has it they departed last night around 10 pm.


















My guess is that they are still on the island, hoping to find a kind soul to take them in. If you see them, please report their whereabouts to the authorities...or just leave a comment.

Out latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Pamlico Sound

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 04:58
Several days ago a reader asked this question: "Where did the name Pamlico come from?"

Of course, Pamlico Sound is the name of the lagoon or estuary that is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the chain of barrier islands called the Outer Banks. It is approximately 80 miles long and 30 miles wide, making it the largest lagoon on the east coast of the United States.

NASA Photo of Pamlico Sound














The Pamlico River, formed by the confluence of the Tar River and Tranters Creek, is a tidal river in eastern North Carolina that flows into Pamlico Sound.

Following are the various spellings I located on a dozen early maps (mapmakers' names in parentheses):

Pamxlico River, 1657 (Comberford)
Pemptico [River], 1672 (Ogilby)
Pamticoe Sound, 1733 (Moseley)
Pamticoe River, 1770 (Collet)
Pamticoe Sound, 1775 (Mouzon)
Pamtico Sound, 1808 (Price-Strother)
Pamplico Sound, 1833 (Mac Rae-Brazier)
Pamplico Sound, 1861 (Colton)
Pamlico Sound, 1861 (Bachman)
Pamplico Sound, 1865 (US Coast Survey)
Pamlico Sound, 1882 (Kerr-Cain)
Pamlico Sound, 1896 (Post Route Map)

Roger L. Payne, in his book Place Names of the Outer Banks, lists one other spelling, Pamticough, and writes that "the lagoon is named for the Pamlico or Paquiac Indians who inhabited its shores...."

Payne adds, "Paquiac is the Algonquian word for shallow area and actually referred to Pamlico Sound but was misapplied by early mapmakers [to 'portions of Hatteras and Pea islands']."

Out latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a reprint of a 1948 article about the Mail Boat Aleta, "Boat Hauls Mail, More." You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs