Ocracoke Island Journal

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An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3823125
Updated: 4 hours 38 min ago

More Halloween Photos

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 14:44
I just posted six more Halloween photos sent to me by Sally Beachy. You can see them here:
http://villagecraftsmen.blogspot.com/2015/10/halloween.html.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Another Critter

Wed, 11/04/2015 - 05:35
Last week I made an excursion "down below" (an island expression for the area north of the NPS campground) to hike with friends at "old hammock." One of the island's largest live oaks is growing on an overgrown path there, near the sound.

Old Hammock Oak

















To read more about Ocracoke's majestic live oaks click here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news122908.htm.

When we stepped out of the truck we were startled to see, just off the side of the highway, this black snake curled up, enjoying the sunshine.














Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Alligator...Again

Tue, 11/03/2015 - 05:27
On Thursday I published a post about alligators in Hyde County and on the Outer Banks. My friend Jim, from Manteo, sent me this recent photo:












And Marie sent me this a link to an article from August 12, about an alligator near the Neuse River in eastern North Carolina:    http://www.newbernsj.com/article/20150812/NEWS/150819660/14880/NEWS

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Pirate Jamboree

Mon, 11/02/2015 - 05:59
Tricorn hats, muskets, cutlasses, feathers, and tankards of grog were in evidence Friday afternoon when pirates invaded Ocracoke! The buccaneers set up a pirate encampment at the Wahab House and at Berkley Manor. Tavern games, piratical gear, and 18th century clothing and artifacts were on display.


















The Brigand's Bazaar featured seafaring arts & crafts for sale, with vendors dressed in period costumes.


















Roving minstrels strolled village streets, and The Motley Tones entertained residents and visitors with songs, ballads, pub songs and sea shanties from Blackbeard's day. Bawdy songs were reserved for after-hours when the young-uns were in their beds.


















Military detachments stood at attention as commands were issued and cannons were fired.














Early afternoon on Saturday the Meka II and the Ada Mae engaged in a battle in Silver Lake Harbor.














Many a piratical tale was told, and historian Kevin Duffus presented a detailed portrait of Capt. Blackbeard's last days and his battle at Ocracoke Inlet with Lt. Robert Maynard of the British Royal Navy on November 22, 1718.














On Sunday morning the pirate and militia crews marched from Blackbeard's Lodge to Springer's Point to remember the final battle.














It was a fun weekend for the re-enactors, visitors, and island residents. If you missed it this year, mark your calendar for 2016. Every year gets better!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Halloween

Fri, 10/30/2015 - 04:37
Halloween on Ocracoke kicks off with a parade of costumes around the school circle during the school's annual celebration. This photo was taken last week. Elementary students and teen-agers enjoyed dressing up for the day.

















This year's celebration also included a hay ride and ghost stories (my daughter Amy, Heather Johnson, and I kept the children on the edge of their hay bales!), as well as games, horse rides, and a climbing wall. Trick or Treating will be Saturday, October 31.

To coincide with Halloween this year, today begins the annual Pirate Jamboree. This is always a rollicking good time for young and old. Hope to see you there. I am hoping to post photos of the 2015 Jamboree next week.

Update, 11/4/15: I am posting several more Ocracoke Halloween photos sent to me by Sally Beachy.



















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Alligators

Thu, 10/29/2015 - 08:47
I recently came across this short blurb from The Washington Gazette (Washington, Beaufort Co. NC) - Thursday, June 12, 1884; pg. 3; column 4: "It is not generally known that there are alligators in our county, but they are seen occasionally; one was seen at Rose Bay a short while since."

I wondered if any alligators have been seen in eastern North Carolina recently. I found this article from August 3, 2015, on the website, PilotOnline.com:

"Big alligators are showing up frequently where people are in North Carolina.

"A 12-foot monster blocked traffic in March on a back road in Brunswick County, according to news reports. A 9-footer was removed in June from a neighborhood in New Hanover County. A boater spotted a gator swimming in Oregon Inlet in June. A 12-foot veteran of the Dare County swamps was struck and killed on U.S. 64 in May last year....

"Though they haven't been found on Outer Banks beaches, alligators do linger in inland sections of coastal Dare and Hyde counties. And in those spots, they appear to be on the increase...."

The article assures us that "Despite the recent spate of human encounters with gators in North Carolina, biologists stressed that the creatures rarely attack. 'People can peacefully coexist with alligators,' [biologist Jeff] Hall said."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

An Evening Get-Together

Wed, 10/28/2015 - 05:17
Much like the salons of the 17th & 18th centuries, a small group of islanders and off-island friends gathered this week to share music, poetry, art, dance, and ideas.

An Evening Music Jam at the Soundfront Inn













This is what Wikipedia has to say about a salon: It is "a gathering of people under the roof of an inspiring host, held partly to amuse one another and partly to refine the taste and increase the knowledge of the participants through conversation.... Salons, commonly associated with French literary and philosophical movements of the 17th and 18th centuries, were carried on until recently in urban settings."

A few Ocracoke islanders are continuing the tradition begun here in 1940 with the establishment of the "Island Workshop." You can read about the Island Workshop here:  http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112908.htm.
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter, is the story of the 1909 wreck of the steamship Brewster, known to Ocracokers as The Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Bonner Bridge

Mon, 10/26/2015 - 04:35
On this date in 1990 a dredge collided with the Herbert C. Bonner bridge (which spans Oregon inlet) during a storm, causing the collapse of a lengthy segment of the bridge. The accident isolated residents and visitors on Hatteras Island. In order to leave Hatteras thousands of vacationers were forced to take the Hatteras Inlet ferry to Ocracoke and then board a ferry to Swan Quarter or Cedar Island. In short order, Ocracoke Island was flooded with refugees. Ferry lines for vehicles waiting to board the ferries to the mainland stretched down NC 12 as far as the National Park Service campground. Waiting times quickly expanded to days, rather than hours.

The situation developed quickly, with stranded visitors dealing with cold nights, extremely limited accommodations (hundreds of people were forced to sleep in their cars), hunger, and lack of facilities. As soon as Ocracoke islanders realized the extent of the problem, volunteers were organized to care for the stranded motorists. We made sandwiches, and delivered food and beverages to the unfortunate folks. Motel owners and individuals offered free rooms to families with young children or elderly persons.

It took days to evacuate visitors from Hatteras and Ocracoke, and many weeks for emergency construction workers to repair the breach and reconnect the only highway link to the rest of the Outer Banks and the mainland.

You can read more about the accident, with photos, in an article written five years ago in the Island Free Press. Click here to read the article.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of the Wreck of the Banana Boat. You can read it here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news102115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Buffaloes

Fri, 10/23/2015 - 04:46
[There were no posts for the last two days because I was out sailing in Pamlico Sound with Capt. Rob and other friends...and I neglected to schedule posts while I was away. But I am back again. I hope you missed me!]

A monument near the National Park Service Visitors Center remembers veterans of the Civil War from Ocracoke and Portsmouth Islands.

Photo courtesy OPS















Although most island soldiers fought for the Confederacy, some joined the Union army. John Carbone, in The Civil War in Coastal North Carolina, writes that "A number of Bankers and other coastal residents joined the two regiments of Union infantry composed of native North Carolinians known as 'buffaloes.' To be sure, not all Outer Bankers supported their invaders. At the same time as some were taking the oath of allegiance and joining the Federal ranks, others were crossing the sounds and enlisting in Confederate units such as the Thirty-third North Carolina Regiment being formed in Hyde county in the autumn of 1861."

Historian David Stick has written that "Whether the Union sentiment, especially on Hatteras Island [and we might add Ocracoke], was of the genuine, inbred type or simply an expedient to make the best of changing conditions, the fact is that many of the Bankers did side with the North."

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of whale and porpoise fishing on  the Outer Banks. You can read the story here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082115.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs