Ocracoke Island Journal

Syndicate content
An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3290125
Updated: 1 day 15 hours ago

Festival Housing

Wed, 01/29/2014 - 05:40
The 2014 OcraFolk Festival will be held June 6-8. This is always a weekend filled with fabulous musicians, talented storytellers, and other outstanding performers. The Festival also features arts & crafts displays, an art auction, and a traditional Ocracoke square dance.
Bob Zentz & His Concertina

















This year the Festival Committee is looking for accommodations for some of the performers. 

 Sunday Evening Jam













The performers are all fun, talented, and creative people. If you have an Ocracoke guest bedroom or apartment that you’d be willing to share with one or more of our friends from afar, please contact Gary Mitchell at 252-928-4280 or email molassescreek@embarqmail.com

This would be great way for you to support the OcraFolk Festival.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Success!

Tue, 01/28/2014 - 06:06
Saturday night's Silent Art Auction at the Ocracoke Preservation Society Museum attracted more than eighty residents and visitors. One piece of art brought a high bid of $250. The popular event netted close to $5,000 for the ongoing work of island preservation. In addition to raising needed funds, the auction provided a pleasant evening for a community gathering in the cold days of January.

You can read more about the Art Auction in our wonderful on-line "newspaper" the Ocracoke Current: http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/80779.



























Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The God Article

Mon, 01/27/2014 - 06:15
I recently came across an interesting article written by Mark Sandlin, a Presbyterian minister and contributor to the Huffington Post. Rev. Sandlin writes on his Facebook page, "One of my recent blogs ended up on BOTH Sojourners (one of the largest social-justice Christian blogs) and The Richard Dawkins Foundation (one of the largest atheist blogs). Kind of wild."

I am posting a link to his article below. This is a bit of a departure from my typical posts, but if you read to the bottom of the article, just before the comments, you will see a photo of the author. Read the next to the last sentence of his bio...and you will see what prompted me to publish this link.

Maybe Rev. Sandlin will be just as impressed that he is being referenced on the Ocracoke Journal, as on Sojourners & the Richard Dawkins Foundation! Perhaps he will even leave a comment.

http://www.thegodarticle.com/7/post/2014/01/10-things-you-cant-say-while-following-jesus.html

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Ferry Toll Issue...Again!

Sun, 01/26/2014 - 05:44
The North Carolina Department of Transportation will hold four public meetings about proposed toll changes on its ferry routes.  Times and dates are posted here:  https://apps.ncdot.gov/NewsReleases/details.aspx?r=9270.

In 2013 the General Assembly passed SB402 which laid out a process by which new ferries will be purchased. Under the legislation the Department of Transportation must lay out a system-wide tolling methodology, and conduct public hearings in affected communities by March 1. More information is available here: http://www.ncdot.gov/download/transit/ferry/Proposed_Ferry_Toll_Rates.pdf.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Chili

Sat, 01/25/2014 - 05:37
Cold winter days call for hot homemade chili. And the Ocracoke Child Care will be catering to that need on Sunday, February 2 (Super Bowl Sunday)!

Get ready for the 1st annual Ocracoke Child Care Chili Cook-off Fundraiser! Prepare your recipes and save the date. Prizes will be awarded in several categories, including Most Unique, Crowd Favorite, Spiciest, Best-in-Show, and Best Alternative.

For complete information visit the Ocracoke Current:  http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/80401.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Art Auction

Fri, 01/24/2014 - 05:35
Ocracoke Preservation Society's Art Auction, "Through Your Eyes," is scheduled for tomorrow, January 25. You can place bids even if you are not on the island. OPS is accepting remote bids until 4 pm Saturday, January 25. You can see images, and read more details here: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.616651635038927.1073741838.109598372410925&type=1

You can also contact Amy Howard, OPS Administrator, for information, or to place a bid, by email:
 admin@ocracokepreservation.org.

 Just a few of the canvases available:

By Trudy Austin
By Kyle Tillett

By Flavia Burton





































The Ocracok Current has published an article about the Art Auction. You can read that here: http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/80433

Come out to the Museum between 5 & 7 pm tomorrow to place your bids and enjoy wine & cheese. Or place your bid remotely to own a piece of Ocracoke Island art!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Henry Pigott's Clam Chowder

Thu, 01/23/2014 - 05:58
Last month Lou Ann and I visited Portsmouth Island. In April we will be there for Homecoming, hosting at Henry Pigott's house, a tiny cottage on Doctor's Creek.














Henry, the last male to live on the island, died in 1971. After his death the last two residents, Marion Babb and Elma Dixon, moved to the mainland.

While on Portsmouth in December I discovered this recipe for Henry Pigott's clam chowder:

Ingredients: 2 quarts clams with their juice, 2 quarts water, 7 or 8 onions, 1/2 pound bacon, salt & pepper.

Instructions: Fry bacon and drain. Sautee onions in bacon grease until clear. Into a 6-8 quart pot, crumble bacon and add sauteed onions and 2 quarts of water. Simmer slowly for 5 minutes. Add clams and juice. (You may use a food grinder to mince the clams.) Cook until done. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

WW II

Wed, 01/22/2014 - 05:53
"In 1942, the United States suffered one of its worst defeats of the Second World War. Between January and July, more than 65 German U-boats waged a withering, widespread campaign against Allied merchant vessels and their military defenders. Three hundred ninety-seven ships were sunk or damaged in just half a year. Nearly 5,000 people, including many civilians, were burned to death, crushed, drowned, or vanished into the sea....

"The greatest concentration of these attacks occurred in the war zone off North Carolina's Outer Banks on the approaches to Diamond Shoals, a notorious place feared for centuries as the Graveyard of the Atlantic."  -- War Zone, World War II off the North Carolina Coast, by Kevin P. Duffus, pp 23-24.

Sinking of the Tanker Dixie Arrow Mar. 26, 1942













According to the web site, Sunken Ships of the Outer Banks:
  • Over 70 ships sank off the Carolina coast
  • 3 German U-boats were sunk
  • More than 90% of ship sinkings off the Coast during the four years of submarine attacks during WWII occurred during the first 6 months of 1942
  • During March the U-boats averaged one sinking per day 
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Drawing

Tue, 01/21/2014 - 05:29
Visitors to Ocracoke may remember seeing this wooden skiff tied up at the Community Square dock.















This skiff was built on Ocracoke about forty years ago by my father, Lawton Howard. It now belongs to me. Unfortunately, I haven't had it in the water much lately because there have been numerous problems with the outboard motor.

The sketch above was made by my 15 year old grandson, Eakin Howard. You can see more of his artwork at http://eakinsdrawings.wordpress.com/.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Celibacy

Mon, 01/20/2014 - 06:09
Alice Rondthaler (see our March, 2012 Newsletter) wrote these words in 1976:

"Well do I remember the years [before private telephones came to the island in 1956] when only emergency calls could be made from the Ocraocke Lifeboat Station. We put through one of these late in the 1930s to an Ocracoke summer friend who was being married in New York.

"This is how our telegram read: 'Sorry to learn that Celibacy is dying. Our profound sympathy.'

"It was a real emergency; the boy in the tower only asked, 'How do you spell the dying lady's name?'"

(From "The Story of Ocracoke Island," pages 35-36)

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Otter Trail?

Sun, 01/19/2014 - 05:30
I know this isn't much of a picture. I took it from the viewing platform on the sound side of the Hammock Hills Nature Trail. Every time I stand there and look down I notice the mashed down marsh grass. I always assume that these are "trails" made by otters.


















River otters are relatively common in Silver Lake harbor. They are often seen in the vicinity of the NPS docks and near the Jolly Roger restaurant. I have even seen them swimming in Pamlico Sound, not far from the shore. However, I have never seen them at the end of the Nature Trail. Can any of our readers confirm that these "trails" were made by otters?

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an account of the 2013 Portsmouth Island Christmas Bird Count. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

January Newsletter

Sat, 01/18/2014 - 05:43
We have just published our latest Ocracoke Island Newsletter. Lou Ann recounts our excursion to Portsmouth Island for the annual Christmas Bird Count last month.

Carol Pahl & Birds


















You can read our Newsletter here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news012114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Fire Break

Fri, 01/17/2014 - 05:19
Many islanders fear fire more than hurricanes. Acres of cedars and pines in the National Park, along with thick vegetation in this small village of closely spaced wood frame homes, cause many of us concern.

This past fall the National Park Service eased our fears a bit by creating a fire break at the edge of the village.

Looking North from NC12
Looking South from NC12



























We hope we will never have to see if the fire break works.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Another Rare Creature...

Thu, 01/16/2014 - 00:00
...visits Ocracoke.

Watch this video of a harbor seal that Amy made yesterday as we were walking down the beach. If you keep watching you will see his head surface now and then between the waves.




 To see a few still photos, visit our Facebook page.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Supercargo

Wed, 01/15/2014 - 06:02
"Supercargo" is a word I encountered not too long ago while reading Alexandre Dumas' book, The Count of Monte Cristo. It is a maritime term that designates a person hired by the owner of a ship's cargo to look after his property. Specifically, the supercargo is obligated to maintain the security of the cargo while at sea, to manage the sale of the property when arriving at the port of destination, and to purchase or receive other goods for the return voyage.

No doubt Ocracoke islanders were well acquainted with this word during the great age of sail when numerous coastal schooners and other ships passed our shores, stopped here to "lighter" their cargo, or anchored nearby to weather storms. In those days many a young Ocracoke man heeded the call of the sea to pursue the life of a sailor.

Today, the word comes to the great-great grandson of those eighteenth and nineteenth century sailors by reading a book!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Oyster Wars

Tue, 01/14/2014 - 06:02
For many years oysters were harvested in coastal North Carolina with hand tongs. These consisted of wide rakes with attached "baskets" that were mounted on the ends of wooden tongs up to 20 feet long. The tongs were worked in scissor-like fashion from sloops and other sailboats. (Do an Internet search to see images of traditional oyster tongs.)

I don't have access to any vintage photographs of North Carolina watermen using oyster tongs, but this photo from Florida is typical.

Oyster Tonging in Florida











(Photo courtesy, State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/6894)

In the late nineteenth century oyster dredgers were brought into Pamlico Sound. Skipjacks (or oyster sloops) could harvest as many oysters in an hour as a tonger could collect in a day. This led to the Oyster Wars of 1891, when local watermen, armed with rifles and shotguns, drove the dredgers out of the Sound.

James Horatio (Raysh) Williams, Jr. was eighteen years old when the Oyster Wars irrupted. He wrote a song commemorating the islanders' victory. Most of the song has been forgotten, but these few lines survive:

"It was just about night,
They sank the ships out of sight,
And drove the Core Sounders away."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Parking Area

Mon, 01/13/2014 - 05:41
I came across this photo a while ago. It was taken in the late 1950s or the early 1960s. This is one of the Ocracoke parking areas for access to the beach. In those days they were paved with WWII "landing mats."













I have written about landing mats in previous posts. But I thought our readers would enjoy seeing the mats in the ways they were actually used. There is more information here: http://villagecraftsmen.blogspot.com/2013/07/marsden-mats.html.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Bridge over the Gut

Sun, 01/12/2014 - 05:48
Prior to World War II two small tidal streams flowed from Cockle Creek (later renamed Silver Lake) toward the "bald beach." These streams, or "guts" as they were known by islanders, divided the village into two major areas, Around Creek (including the Community Store, Howard Street, etc.) and Down Point (from the southern side of the Island Inn to the lighthouse and in that general vicinity).

Several primitive wooden bridges spanned the guts. I discovered this never-before-published photo after my father died. It was probably taken in the 1930s.












From left to right (back to front), to the best of my knowledge: Juliana Guth (my mother's mother), Kunigunde Guth Howard (my mother), Helena Guth Webster (my mother's sister), Lawton Howard (my father), and an unknown man.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Art Show & Silent Auction

Sat, 01/11/2014 - 05:34
Here is your opportunity to own an original Ocracoke work of art. On Jan. 25, 2014 the Ocracoke Preservation Society will be hosting an art show and silent auction titled, "Ocracoke, Through Your Eyes." 

Nearly 100 artists have received canvases (all 6" x 8") with which to be creative. Here are three examples:

Artist: Nancy Carlson
Artist: John Simpson
Artist: Pat Schweninger










































More canvases can be viewed on line at https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.616651635038927.1073741838.109598372410925&type=1

OPS will be accepting remote bids (explanation of that will come soon) and will mail the canvases if you win. 

 Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Motor Lifeboat

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 05:37
Last fall the Hatteras Inlet Coast Guard Station's 47 foot motor lifeboat was tied up at the National Park Service docks here at Ocracoke...and the crew welcomed visitors aboard.

Hatteras Inlet 47 Footer
A Peak Inside the Pilot House






























This very sophisticated vessel is built from marine grade aluminum, and is designed to right itself in fewer than ten seconds if it capsizes.

Many thanks to all of the men and women of the United States Coast Guard for their presence and dedication to duty protecting our shores and our coastal communities.

You can read more about this impressive vessel here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/47-foot_Motor_Lifeboat.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is a 1921 letter written by a former slave, Harrison Williams, to Ocracoke native, Martha Ann Howard Wahab. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news112113.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs