Ocracoke Island Journal

Syndicate content
An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3495125
Updated: 1 day 1 min ago

Barnacles

Mon, 09/29/2014 - 04:24
Pat Garber begins her chapter on "Barnacles: The Bane of the Seas" (in her book Ocracoke Wild) with this observation by nineteenth century naturalist, Louis Agassiz: "A little shrimp-like animal standing on its head in a limestone house and kicking food into its mouth."


















Pat goes on to explain that for a long time barnacles were believed to be mollusks. Now we know that these critters who foul pilings, anchor lines, and the bottoms of all vessels, from canoes to ocean-going tankers, are marine arthropods, relatives of crabs and shrimp.  

According to Popular Science magazine, "the U.S. Naval Academy estimates that biofouling creates enough hull-drag to increase the Navy's petroleum bill by about $250 million every year."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government established at Hatteras in 1861. You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Periauger Video

Sun, 09/28/2014 - 15:03
For readers who might have missed DC's comment on today's earlier post, this 10-minute YouTube video is a great place to see footage of a periauger being constructed and sailed: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgmvLCDZc2E.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Periauger

Sun, 09/28/2014 - 04:43
North Carolinians, including Ocracokers, relied heavily on two-masted flat-bottomed vessels called periaugers to transport goods on the rivers, creeks and sounds along the coast in the 18th & 19th centuries. In addition to sails (either gaff-rigged or Bermuda-rigged), periaugers carried oars so they could be rowed.

Periaugers (sometimes called perogues) had no bowsprit, and were originally constructed from dug-out cypress logs. Later, the logs were sometimes split down the middle, and planks added between, to make a larger vessel. Some periaugers were constructed entirely of planks.

The periauger was so common in Colonial America that it was not considered necessary to document the boat thoroughly. Unfortunately, steam-powered vessels eventually replaced periaugers so completely that no physical evidence of the vessels remained by the middle of the 20th century.

In 2003, relying on extensive research and historical records, construction of a replica periauger was begun in Beaufort, North Carolina. This periauger, now berthed in Hertford, North Carolina, is the only known boat of its kind in the world.

Follow these links for more information, and to see photos: http://beaufortartist.blogspot.com/2007/10/periauger.html and http://perquimansrestoration.org/Periauger_OVPE.html.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government established at Hatteras in 1861. You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Franklin & Josephus

Sat, 09/27/2014 - 05:17
Last week I began watching the seven-part film by Ken Burns, The Roosevelts, An Intimate History. Episode three chronicles Franklin Delano Roosevelt's appointment as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, serving under North Carolinian, Josephus Daniels, Jr.

While watching the film, I was reminded that Josephus Daniels (1862-1948), at just two years old, was taken to live on Ocracoke after Washington, NC was burned during the Civil War. Until the war ended he lived with his family in a house (which is no longer standing) directly across the road from the Community Store.

In 1913 Josephus Daniels was appointed Secretary of the Navy by President Woodrow Wilson.

Josephus Daniels, Jr.


















You can read more about Josephus Daniels and the Civil War in eastern North Carolina here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022112.htm.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government established at Hatteras in 1861. You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

A Golden Evening

Fri, 09/26/2014 - 05:04
Two days ago I posted on our Facebook page a photo of a beautiful rainbow that appeared just as I was walking out of my house. Shortly before that I had noticed, as I looked from my porch, a gorgeous golden hue in the western sky. It was so striking that I grabbed my camera and took this picture:














In spite of all the rain we've had recently, this is still an outstanding autumn!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government established at Hatteras in 1861. You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Not Tide

Thu, 09/25/2014 - 04:23
So often this time of year islanders and visitors are dealing with storms and hurricanes. Not so, this year. As I write there is not even a single "invest" (a future tropical depression) in the North Atlantic. (And I am not so superstitious as to think that my mentioning this might trigger a hurricane!).

However, we have had rain, rain, and more rain for days. Howard Street & Lawton Lane are just a series of ever-larger puddles. This is a photo of my soggy yard (the water is up to the first step).














So, we will all be happy when the rain finally stops. I am sure folks who are here on vacation right now are wishing they'd chosen a different week. But at least this is rain water, not tide water. We can all be happy about that.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government established at Hatteras in 1861. You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Old Age

Wed, 09/24/2014 - 04:38
In Memory of Ann HowardWife of George HowardBorn 1724 Died November 24, 1841Aged 117 years
 

So reads the tombstone in the old George Howard cemetery on British Cemetery Road.

Jonathan Price, in his 1795 map and article, "A Description of Occacock Inlet," writes that about thirty families were living on the island, and that one of the "original proprietors" had reached his "ninetieth year" and did not "appear to feel any of the infirmities of age." This was undoubtedly William Howard, Sr., one-time owner of Ocracoke Island.

Nationwide, about 5% of the "above 65 year old" population of the United States is more than 90 years old.

At the present time there are at least three island residents who are over 90 years old. 

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government established at Hatteras in 1861. You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

September Newsletter

Tue, 09/23/2014 - 05:10
We have just published our latest Ocracoke Newsletter. This month's article is about the Unionist North Carolina State Government that was established in 1861 right here on the Outer Banks, with Hatteras as capital!

You can read all about it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092114.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Fresnel Lens

Mon, 09/22/2014 - 04:22
What is a Fresnel Lens?

Rodney Barfield, in his book Seasoned by Salt, explains: "The Fresnel (pronounced Fre-NEL) lens developed by French physicist Augustin Fresnel, was a technological leap in navigational lighting. It is a glass dome of prisms and bull's-eyes, and light is concentrated at its center into parallel rays that are intensified with a magnifying glass."



















This is a photo of the fourth order Fresnel lens in the Ocracoke lighthouse. Although the Fresnel lens was invented in 1822, and the Ocracoke lighthouse was built in 1823, a Fresnel lens was not installed until 1854.

The Ocracoke light (now produced by a 250 watt quartz-halogen bulb, and magnified by the lens) is equal to 8,000 candlepower, and is visible 14 miles to sea.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Cutter Head

Sun, 09/21/2014 - 04:47
Many of our readers have seen dredges working in Hatteras Inlet or in the Swan Quarter/Cedar Island ferry channel. But I wonder how many have ever seen the dredge cutter head, the working end of the dredge that cuts through the bottom so the sand can be sucked up and deposited in the "hopper," cast over the side from a long pipe, or pumped through a pipeline to a "spoil island."

The other day I noticed that a truck from Cape Dredging Company in Buxton, NC was parked in front of the Pub. On the trailer was a cutter head. So I stopped and made a couple of photos for our readers.





























Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Crime

Sat, 09/20/2014 - 04:38
I subscribe to Google Alerts. Anytime Ocracoke is mentioned on the web I receive a notification. Recently I saw this headline: "Compare Crime Rates, New York, NY -- Ocracoke, NC." So I clicked on the link (http://www.bestplaces.net/crime/?city1=53651000&city2=53748740).

This is what appeared! (According to the web site, "The crime indices range 1-100. A higher number corresponds with more crime. Our crime rates are based on FBI data.") --  

Violent Crime in Ocracoke.............61.2
Violent Crime in New York City....63.5
Violent Crime in the US..................41.4

Property Crime in Ocracoke...........71.2
Property Crime in New York City..31.7
Property Crime in the US................43.5

I suppose the FBI has been investigating murders, rapes, burglaries, arson, and violent assaults on Ocracoke that I was just not aware of! How could I have missed this mayhem right under my nose?

Isn't the Internet just wonderful.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Talk Like a Pirate Day

Fri, 09/19/2014 - 04:40
Arrrrgh, Mateys!

Well, shiver me timbers, today is "International Talk Like a Pirate Day." So dust off your cutlass, don a tricorn hat, or tuck a treasure map inside your dress (if you're not an Anne Bonney or Mary Reed, you might consider different attire)...and face the world of land lubbers like the buccaneer you know you can be.

If you need a bit of encouragement, check out this web site: http://www.talklikeapirate.com/piratehome.html. Remember, talk like a pirate. You can do it!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.




Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Lorena, Ira & Elsie

Thu, 09/18/2014 - 04:45
I recently received a copy of this photograph, taken about 1896. Seated is Lorena Howard Wyche, and two of her three children, Ira Thomas and Elsie Marvin.


















Ira's grand-daughter, Liz Williamson, sent me the picture. It was taken shortly before Lorena died. She was only 31 years old. Elsie continued to live on Ocracoke the rest of her life. Ira went to West Point, and served in WWII as a two-star General.


















You can read General Wyche's story here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092110.htm.

----------------------------------------
Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Answers

Wed, 09/17/2014 - 05:00
A recent issue of Time magazine ("The Answers Issue, Everything You Never Knew You Needed to Know"), includes some interesting statistics.

Average length of an American worker's one-way commute, in minutes -- 25.5 (for Ocracokers it's maybe 2 or 3)

Percentage of commuters who leave their county to work -- 25% (for Ocracokers this is essentially zero)

Average distance in miles that Americans live from the nearest Walmart-- 6.7 (that's probably about 10 minutes; for Ocracokers it is about 3 hours)

Percentage of Americans who live within 3 miles of McDonalds -- 75% (0% for Ocracokers; we are about 2 1/2 hours from the nearest McDonalds)

Percentage of Americans who live within 60 minutes of a body of water-- 90% (all Ocracokers, of course, live within just a couple of minutes of water)

Percentage of Americans who live within 60 minutes of a National Park -- 75% (all Ocracokers, of course, live within just a few minutes of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore)

Life is in large measure about choices. We islanders generally choose nature, community, and family over convenience, high-paying jobs, and proximity to shopping centers, fast food...even doctors and dentists. Island life is not for everyone.

---------------------------------------- Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information: Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Toads

Tue, 09/16/2014 - 04:48
Sometimes toads are numerous on Ocracoke, and sometimes they seem rare. I think it might have a lot to do with storms and hurricanes.

Many ground dwelling critters must die when high tides wash over the island. And it must take a while for the remaining individuals to reproduce, and for the species to recover. Lately I've seen a few more toads than I have for a while. This is reassuring.
















----------------------------------------Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Counting Toes

Mon, 09/15/2014 - 04:56
The Atlantic Ocean at Ocracoke is almost always a great place for everyone in the family. Unless there is a storm brewing offshore, the ocean is usually safe, but still exciting. The bottom does not drop off suddenly, and the waves can be gentle enough for young children and elders. But sometimes the waves are powerful enough for dramatic boogie-boarding or serious surfing. In addition, the ocean is clean, and the beaches uncluttered

On Saturday the ocean was noticeably different. Lachlan and I went out to the beach in the morning for a quick swim, and stayed for an hour and a half. There were a few waves, but mostly the water was gentle and relaxing. Usually the water is a bit cloudy because constant wave action stirs up the sand. But Saturday the water was so clear that I could stand submerged up to my chin and still clearly see every one of my toes.

Neither Lachan nor I wanted to get out of the water, but we reluctantly went home to have some lunch.

I went back again in the afternoon!

 ----------------------------------------
Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Drying Racks or ?

Sun, 09/14/2014 - 05:00
I recently came across this picture of the home of Rev. George Leffers (Leff) Fulcher (1838-1898) and his wife Cynthia Stowe Fulcher (1848-1913). They lived in Frisco, on Hatteras Island. The photo was reproduced in the book Fulcher Family by Ruth Fulcher Rickert.















In addition to being a wonderful vintage photo of a typical Hatteras Island home before the outbreak of the Civil War, the picture includes two interesting objects in the front yard. If you look closely you will notice two posts about 6' high (a man is standing next to each one). You might want to enlarge the photo to get a better view (instructions on the right). 
Each post has about ten rows of sticks attached horizontally to the post at intervals of perhaps six or eight inches. It looks to me as if each row includes four sticks (two side by side, one on each side of the post; with two more directly on top of them at right angles).
I have shown the photo to several Ocracoke islanders, but no one has ever seen anything like this before. My guess is that these objects were used for  cultivating pole beans...or perhaps for drying fish. Any other guesses?

----------------------------------------Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Story & a Jump

Sat, 09/13/2014 - 04:30
Many of our readers know my house on Lawton Lane...a traditional "story and a jump," as they say in eastern North Carolina. These one-and-a-half story cottages were popular on Ocracoke from the mid- 1800s through the early twentieth century. A number of these iconic homes have been preserved on the island. Below are photos of the Kugler Cottage, the first "summer" cottage on Ocracoke.

Kugler Cottage Photo by Kati Wharton
Upstairs Bedroom
Downstairs Bedroom



































 
Sound View by Kati Wharton














----------------------------------------Coming right up -- International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Click on the logo below for more information:Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Women Seeking Men

Fri, 09/12/2014 - 04:37
Before you read the following, please take a look at yesterday's post about six young Ocracoke ladies in 1890. They placed an advertisement seeking young men "who can whirl in the giddy maze of the waltz," and were ready to  "indulge in seaside flirtation without stint or reservation."

Just hours after I published that post I discovered this short news article in the latest The Week magazine:

"Good week for...Single men, after a feminist commune in Brazil that is populated by 600 women appealed for bachelors to move to the town. 'I haven't kissed a man for a long time,' said Nelma Fernandes, 23."

It seems as if there is nothing new under the sun. Every time you turn around young women are looking for young men to add zest to their lives! So, take your pick...Brazil or Ocracoke. As the village girls sing to Blackbeard's pirate crew in Julie Howard's Ocracoke Island musical, A Tale of Blackbeard, "So, come on around, there's a lot to be found, at Euphemia's Boarding House."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

What Were They Thinking??

Thu, 09/11/2014 - 04:45
I will let this advertisement, published Sunday, August 10, 1890 in The State Chronicle, speak for itself.

A GOOD OPENING----------For Young Men Who Carry Their Brains in Their Heels.
Six young ladies at Ocracoke, and as sweet and beautiful as the State can furnish, requests [sic] us to insert an advertisement for a dozen or two young men who can dance. They are ready, willing and waiting for an opportunity to whirl in the giddy maze of the waltz and to indulge in seaside flirtation without stint or reservation. Young men come to the rescue.

----------------------------------
What WERE they thinking?
Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs