Ocracoke Island Journal

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An Occasional Journal of Daily Island Life.Philiphttp://www.blogger.com/profile/01572532603071469799noreply@blogger.comBlogger3882125
Updated: 1 day 16 hours ago

Portsmouth

Mon, 05/02/2016 - 04:38
Just a few photos from Saturday's Portsmouth Island Homecoming celebration.

Church Steeple from the Schoolhouse Path
Washington Roberts House (ca. 1850)
Interior of Roberts House
Henry Pigot's House
Hymn Sing in the Church
Schoolhouse
US Life-Saving Station












































































Several hundred people attended, including many descendants of historic Portsmouth Island families.  And the island was blessedly free of mosquitoes!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

How Times Have Changed!

Fri, 04/29/2016 - 05:00
I was in Blackbeard's Lodge the other day and spied this whimsical sign:













It reminded me of a story that Fred Mallison relates in his book To Ocracoke!. He writes about visiting Ocracoke in the first half of the 20th century. On page 103 he tells about waiting for mail after the mail boat docked late in the afternoon:

"One lady I knew rode to the post office on one of the beach trucks. She was wearing her bathing suit and sat on the truck while others of her party went in for the mail. Although the lady was wrapped in a big beach towel over her bathing suit, Mrs. Howard [Ms. Bessie, the postmaster's wife] thought she was dressed improperly, and threatened to pour boiling water on her if she tried to come in."

I wonder what Ms. Bessie would think if she could see how some summer folks dress in public today!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Stanley Wahab

Thu, 04/28/2016 - 05:19
From the January 30, 1984, issue of the Ocracoke Island News:

"Ocracoke has seen a lot of progress in the last decade. One person who has helped bring progress and modernization to the island was Stanley Wahab (1888-1967)



















"In the late 1930s Stanley built the Wahab Village Hotel in hopes of bringing the tourist trade to Ocracoke.













"This hotel still stands today as Blackbeard's Lodge. Stanley used one wing of the Wahab Village as a roller skating rink. Another wing was converted into a movie theater."

Click here for more information about Stanley Wahab: http://villagecraftsmen.blogspot.com/2013/06/diploma.html.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Bridge Parts?

Wed, 04/27/2016 - 05:18
Last week Amy and I were looking for seashells when we spied a strange shape out in the ocean. What looked like three tall masts or pilings loomed above the horizon. It was clearly not a sailing ship, but it took a few minutes to venture a guess that it was a section of the new Oregon Inlet bridge, now under construction, being towed to the work site.












Amy had her binoculars with her, so we took the following photo through the eye piece. The last photo is a cropped close-up.

































We are not sure this is a structural element of the new bridge, but we think so. At any rate, we'd never before seen anything quite that that out in the ocean.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Do Not Feed the Ducks!

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 04:33
They are cute...especially the little ones. But they can be a nuisance for home owners and business owners. We are talking about ducks.

















In recent years hundreds of mallards have taken up permanent residence in Ocracoke village. Although mallards are protected as migratory waterfowl, these critters are in no hurry to go anywhere, at least not as long as people feed them.

Please Do Not Feed the Ducks!

Feeding them is not good for the ducks...it is not good for residents & visitors...and it is not good for Ocracoke. Feeding the ducks, thereby interrupting their natural migratory instincts, leaves the ducks vulnerable to parasites, disease and death by automobiles. They are much healthier, and live longer, in the wild.

Here is some excellent information from Duck Arm-Y:

"Feeding native ducks is not necessary. They have wings and can fly to find food. Bread and other processed food kills ducks. They die of disease and malnutrition. Lettuce is NOT an appropriate food for ducks. ...A fed duck is a DEAD duck.

"Wild ducks need to eat the green foods that grow naturally in their environment in order to maintain good health and a normal lifespan. Their ability to fly and retain natural instincts for survival depends entirely on the foods they eat. By feeding wild (or dumped domestic ducks) you are contributing to their early death, shortening their lives ten-fold.

"Ducks can literally starve to death if they are fed bread. Bread has no nutritional value for a duck. It is like a human eating cardboard. It fills them up so they don’t look for real food. They die of malnutrition."

For more information, click here: http://outerbanksvoice.com/2016/04/17/ocracoke-group-says-no-to-euthanizing-ducks-crowding-town/.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Rainbow

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 05:01
On Saturday, as we were enjoying conversation after our evening meal, Lachlan came running into the house announcing a rainbow forming in the east. David made this panoramic photo to share with our readers. 


Click on the photo to view a larger image.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Violin made with a Pocket Knife

Fri, 04/22/2016 - 05:13
On April 13 I published the following news clipping about Ocracoke native Stanford Jackson (1859-1944).



















For ease of reading, here is a transcript of the above article, almost certainly written by Aycock Brown:

"Ocracoke, July 7. --- Just after the August hurricane of 1899 Stamford [sic] Jackson, then a young man, set out the sprout of a cedar tree in his yard on Ocracoke Island. During the years the sprout grew and reached maturity. Came the September hurricane of 1933, and the cedar was uprooted like many other trees on the island. For many months the trunk of the tree, trimmed of its branches, lay in the open sun. A few weeks ago Stamford decided to make something from the cured wood by which to remember the sprout he set out during his youth.

"The photo shows Mr. Jackson and the result of his labors. With an ordinary pocket knife he fashioned the violin shown in the picture, supplied it with the strings, bridge and other equipment and now he has a violin which expert musicians declare to be a most unusual instrument."

At the time I wrote the April 13 blog post I had just located the photo the prior evening. Chester Lynn found it in a scrapbook, but I hadn't yet made a copy. Below is the photo of Stanford Jackson and his violin.



















This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Sambo the Live-Saving Horse

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 04:37
This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is a story written in 1968 by Allie (Teenie) Scott. Island resident, Jen Esham, Allie's daughter, shared the story with me. It is a story about Simon Garrish, Jr. (1865-1935) and his United States Life-Saving horse, Sambo.













You can read the story here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Starfish & Olive

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 04:46
A few days ago I was walking along the beach with Amy when I noticed this purple starfish (Astropecten articulatus, also called the Royal Starfish) that had washed up alongside a beautiful lettered olive (Oliva sayana) shell.



















Sometimes starfish wash up on our beach in the hundreds. This time there was only one. When I picked it up I noticed that the tiny tube feet were still undulating. I tossed it back into the surf. Maybe it survived.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Portsmouth and the Civil War

Tue, 04/19/2016 - 05:10
As mentioned earlier this month, the biennial Portsmouth Island Homecoming is scheduled for Saturday, April 30. Following is an excerpt from an article in the September 27, 1953, News and Observer (Raleigh, NC).

"In due time the Civil War descended upon Portsmouth.... Fort Granville, built at Portsmouth in 1753, was fired by the Confederates. The Yankees swarmed over Portsmouth, took possession of the hospital, provisions, cattle and everything else. Old timers today tell that all Portsmouth residents left the island, all except one extremely portly lady, who was too large to be removed from her house -- she just couldn't get through the door. Later, after the Yankee storm had passed and the island residents returned home, the over-sized lady reported the Northern soldiers had treated her kindly."

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Contest Winner

Mon, 04/18/2016 - 04:19
Congratulations to Greg Smith who submitted the winning entry to last week's contest. Greg guessed that the 1951 price of a 1/2 acre lot on Portsmouth Island was $22.50.   His guess was the closest to the actual price of $15.99!

Below is a copy of the original deed. Click on the deed for a larger, easier to read image. For information about how to get an even better quality image please follow the directions on the right, under the icon for OcracokeNavigator.com. 

1951 Deed


















Many thanks to all who entered our contest. We will be mailing this hand-crafted pottery bowl by Sunset Hill Stoneware to Greg in the next few days.


















This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

The Albatross

Fri, 04/15/2016 - 05:00
Lately I have been reading Samuel Taylor Coleridge's epic poem, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." I was reminded of this photograph of Mrs. Abner Dixon who began teaching at the school on Portsmouth Island in 1917.

















This is what Aycock Brown wrote in the Ocracoke Island Beacon on December 15, 1941:

"Elsewhere in this edition today is a picture of Mrs. Abner Dixon, teacher of North Carolina's smallest school, half of her student body, and a stuffed Albatross.... [T]he moth-eaten stuffed bird...at first appeared to be a gigantic sea gull. Interested we asked Mrs. Dixon about the bird, learned it was an albatross, and then wanted to know the story of how this gigantic seabird, native of Antarctic, happened to be at Portsmouth, so she told us this story.

"'Years ago a group of sportsmen arriving at Tom Bragg's for the duck and geese shooting, received as a joke from some friends who could not come along, the stuffed Albatross. They knew that...a live Albatross is an omen of good luck and that a dead one was an omen of bad luck. Whether the stuffed bird brought bad hunting luck to the party is not remembered.

"'After the party left, the big bird was passed from one family to another, each getting rid of it because of the superstition that it was bad luck to have it in the house. Finally, I told them that I was not superstitious, and to let me have the Albatross for the school. I cannot see that it has brought the school bad luck.'

"Then we asked Mrs. Dixon how many students she had enrolled when she first came to Portsmouth. 'About 35' was her reply. 'And how many did you have 10 years ago,' we asked. 'Fifteen or 20,' she added. 'And today you have only four pupils?' we asked. Her reply was in the affirmative."

-------------------------------------------
"God save thee Ancient Mariner,From the fiends that plague thee thus.Why looks thou so? With my crossbowI shot the Albatross" 
 -------------------------------------------
This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Telephone Log

Thu, 04/14/2016 - 04:30
Telephones came to Ocracoke in 1956. In 2014 I published an Ocracoke Newsletter about telephones: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022114.htm.

In the article, I wrote, "When I was a youngster there was only one telephone on the island -- at the Coast Guard station. According to cousin Blanche the US Coast Guard had a ship-to-shore radio telephone as long as she can remember, probably from the time of the construction of the village station in 1905."

The Old Ocracoke Village USCG Station
from OcracokeNavigator.com













I recently came across a transcript of part of a US Coast Guard log about calls made from the station's telephone during four days in February, 1941.  Calls included several to Bells Drug Store in Beaufort, NC, "in regards to medicine," one to the Fisheries Commission "in regards to [an officer's] patrol," one to Atlantic, NC, "in regards to fish," one to City Grocery in Beaufort, NC, "relative to groceries," and one to Betts Bakery in Beaufort, NC, "relative to buying bread [for Clarence Scarborough's island grocery store]."

One incoming call from the Commander of the Norfolk District directed the Ocracoke Station to be on the lookout for a "possible thief" flying an airplane. Another incoming call to Mrs. George F. O'Neal from W. M. Hodges said simply, "Meet me at Atlantic Monday if I am not there wait until I get there."

What a difference from today's instant communication!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Stanford Jackson

Wed, 04/13/2016 - 05:11
Chester Lynn recently shared the following undated news clipping about Ocracoke Native Stanford Jackson (1859-1944).

Click on image to view a larger version
I don't remember Mr. Jackson (he died the year I was born), but I had heard about him, and in 2008 I wrote this (http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news092608.htm):

"In 1940 Mr. Stanford Jackson, an octogenarian island carpenter and recent convert, offered to build the new [Assembly of God] church if the materials could be procured and several helpers found. Eliza O'Neal's sons, John Thomas, and his bother, Steve, and several others volunteered their time.Construction was begun in 1941 and continued into 1942. Sanford Jackson built the first pews as well.

"An article in the Ocracoke Beacon, dated October 15, 1941, recalls, 'Stanford Jackson, expert craftsman, who can make anything from a fiddle to a ship model, with his pocket knife, is now completing a much bigger job. For several months, Stanford has been engaged (almost single-handed) in building the little church down on the Point Road which will be the place of worship for islanders of the Holiness Pentecostal faith.; The church is almost completed, and Stanford Jackson deserves praise for the fine job of carpentering he has done in building this place of worship.'"

[I just located the photo showing Stanford Jackson and his violin. I will publish it soon.]

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Irvin Scott Garrish

Tue, 04/12/2016 - 05:05
Irvin Garrish and his wife Elsie Ballance Garrish were both born and raised on Ocracoke. Irvin's mother was a direct descendant of Agnes Scott for whom Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia, is named. For a time Irvin & Elsie lived and worked off the island, but later returned to their island home on Howard Street. Irvin was a ferry captain and the island’s first representative to the Hyde County board of commissioners. NC Highway 12 (Irvin Garrish Highway) is named for him. Elsie was the island’s nurse. Their daughters, Agnes and Martha, as well as other members of their family, live on the island today

In 2011 Kathy and Bob Phillips purchased their island house and completed a restoration project. The house was featured in an article on the Ocracoke Current.














Irvin was born April 20, 1916, and died in 1997. On Saturday, April 16, Bob & Kathy Phillips will be remembering Irvin by celebrating the 100th anniversary of his birth. You are invited to come to their home on Howard Street to remember Irvin and his many contributions to our community.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Contest

Mon, 04/11/2016 - 05:03
I recently came across a document that recorded an April 8, 1951, sheriff's sale of a 1/2 acre parcel of land in Portsmouth village, just across Ocracoke Inlet. I am wondering if any of our readers can guess how much the bidder paid for the land. If you think you know (or have an educated guess), send us an email at info@villagecraftsmen.com (put "Sheriff's Sale" in the subject line) and fill in the blank in this sentence in the body of the email: "The purchase price of the land was $ ________."

The entry that comes closest to the actual amount will win one 5" hand-crafted pottery bowl by Sunset Hill Stoneware (retail value, $24.00). The bowl includes a "medallion" depicting the Ocracoke Lighthouse, created by Philip Howard, owner of Village Craftsmen.



















Entries dated after 12 noon, April 15, 2016, will not be accepted. Winner will be announced on this blog April 18, 2016. A copy of the 1951 deed will be posted.

Please, one entry per email address (in case of multiple entries from the same email address, only the earliest dated email will be considered). The bowl will be shipped to any address in the United States of America chosen by the winner.

In case of a tie, one winner will be chosen at random from the winning entries.

Of course, employees of Village Craftsmen, and their immediate families, are not eligible to win.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Family Fun Run

Fri, 04/08/2016 - 04:42
Ocracoke Island's Fifth Annual 10K/5K and One Mile Family Fun Run will be held Saturday, April 23, starting at 8 a.m.










A new event this year is Ocracoke's First Annual Half Marathon. This will be held Sunday, April 24, also starting at 8 a.m. These events are benefits for several Ocracoke Island organizations including  the Ocracoke Community Park, Ocracoke School Boosters Club, Ocracoke Community Radio, and Ocracoke Child Care. So far, almost $100,000 has been raised since 2012.

For more information and to register for the races please visit the official web site: http://www.ocracokeisland5krun.org/index.asp.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.  

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Whalebone?

Thu, 04/07/2016 - 04:56
After reading Tuesday's post about Native American pipes & pipe bowls and fossilized bison teeth (all found in the waters near Ocracoke) a reader sent me this photo of items he found in the same areas.














We think these items are whalebone. The bottom artifact appears to be some sort of tool made from whalebone.

In August of last year we published an article about Whale and Porpoise Fishing on the Outer Banks. It is a fascinating story that is not well known.

19th Century Depiction of Cutting Blubber









This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Portsmouth Island Homecoming

Wed, 04/06/2016 - 05:11
It is not too late to make plans for the upcoming biennial Portsmouth Island Homecoming.














This year's Homecoming is scheduled for Saturday, April 30. Not only is this the 50th Anniversary of Cape Lookout National Seashore and the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service, but the Friends of Portsmouth Island, those wonderful people who plan this event, will be celebrating “The Families of Portsmouth." A special Descendant Tent will be set up for Portsmouth families to gather and share their photographs, family trees, scrapbooks, and memories.

Schedule of Events:

9:00 – Buildings/tents open, registration
9:30 – Christening service in church
10:00- Hymn singing in church / children’s activities begin
10:30- Group picture at the church
11:00- Homecoming program under the big tent
12:00- Dinner on the grounds
1:00 – Buildings reopen and children’s activities resume
2:00 – Boats begin returning to Ocracoke

The Post Office will again be open to stamp your mail from Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Island Homecoming has been a tradition since 1992. Portsmouth Village was established in 1753 as a transfer and storage site for goods passing through Ocracoke Inlet. At one time Portsmouth was larger than Ocracoke. However, by the 1950s the population had declined to fewer than 20. The last two remaining residents left the island in 1971.

Reservations for the trip from Ocracoke to Portsmouth should be made by calling Rudy Austin: 252-928-4361. The cost of the ride to Portsmouth is $20 per person round trip.

For more information please visit the Friends of Portsmouth Island web site.

You can read a first-time visitor's story of Portsmouth Island here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042115.htm.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Native American Pipe

Tue, 04/05/2016 - 05:12
In 2011 I published a post about a Native American pipe bowl I found many years ago in the water near Springer's Point (http://villagecraftsmen.blogspot.com/2011/04/native-american-pipe-bowl.html). I posted this photo:














Recently a friend found this fossilized bison's tooth in the water near where I discovered the pipe bowl (see http://villagecraftsmen.blogspot.com/2015/02/tooth-redux.html):














Just a few days ago another neighbor showed me this Native American pipe he found years ago:














A lot of fascinating activities were going on on Ocracoke Island before the first Europeans arrived. If only we knew more!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is about the 1977 recording of traditional Outer Banks folk music. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news032116.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs