Outer Banks Blogs

Wig-Wag

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 04:38
While reading about a 1909 shipwreck on Ocracoke I came across this sentence: "Keeper Barnett then picked up the Creeds Hill life boat and towed her near the station and wigwag[ed] a surfman on the beach to ... come off with the Jersey boat and carrey [sic] the crew of said station on shore."

I did not know what it meant to "wigwag" a surfman, though I suspected it had something to do with signaling. This is what I discovered from Wikipedia:

"In the 1850s,  U.S. Army Major Albert J. Myer, a surgeon by training, developed a system using left or right movements of a flag (or torch or lantern at night). Myer's system used a single flag, waved back and forth in a binary code conceptually similar to the Morse code of dots and dashes. This is sometimes called the wig-wag method of signaling, or 'wig-wagging'."

Signal Corps Insignia
Wig-Wag Flag Movements
























I learn something new almost every day!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Hatteras Ferry Route

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 08/25/2014 - 05:05
For months the Hatteras ferries have been taking a longer route to avoid running aground in the narrow, shallow former channel. In spite of constant dredging by the US Army Corps of Engineers, they have not been able to keep the shorter, 40-minute, run open.

Photo Courtesy Amy Howard


















The US Coast Guard has now announced that the longer, one-hour crossing, has now been made permanent. More information is available from the Virginian-Pilot, on-line: http://hamptonroads.com/2014/08/alternate-hatteras-inlet-ferry-route-made-permanent.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Changing Times

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sun, 08/24/2014 - 05:08
Sometimes, as I read hundred year old newspaper reports about Ocracoke, I am struck with how differently the news was reported back then. I have a difficult time fathoming why writers and editors chose to mention certain details, and to ignore others. The following article was published in The Raleigh Christian Advocate on July 8, 1885:

"[Ocracoke] Island is about fifteen miles long by two and a half wide, about 450 persons live on it, the inhabited part not more than three and a half miles long by one and a half wide. They have not a bar-room here, and there is not a Jew, nor a lawyer, nor a doctor, nor a Baptist here, only one grown negro here and that one has not been away I think in eighteen or twenty years."

I really don't have any further comment, except to wonder again why the writer chose to mention Jews, lawyers, doctors, and Baptists...and not Muslims, florists, opera houses, Catholics, or any number of other religions and professions. I suppose you just had to live in the late 1800s.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Progress

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sat, 08/23/2014 - 04:39
From the Newbern [NC] Daily Progress, December 20, 1862:

"Stove in Church -- For the first time in the history of Portsmouth [Portsmouth Island, NC], a stove was made use of Dec. 7th, for warming the church, having been placed therein by Dr. Loren H. Pease, so that the Islanders and Hospital inmates can now safely attend religious services in winter, as well as other seasons of the year. Verily this has well been styled 'an age of progress,' and there are many incidental advantages growing out of the war."

I am not aware of any photographs of the original Portsmouth Island church. It was destroyed in the 1899 hurricane. The photos below are of the second and third churches built on Portsmouth.

Portsmouth Church, 1900-1913
Cape Lookout National Seashore




















Portsmouth Church, Present Day



















Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Alice Rondthaler

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 08/22/2014 - 05:10
In March of 2012 I published an Ocracoke Newsletter about Alice & Theodore Rondthaler. I recently discovered the following short article in the August 2, 1974 Carolina Beachcomber. It illustrates Alice's dry sense of humor.

JoKo & Alice Rondthaler, 1974
















"Coffee ice cream on the front porch was a highlight of our visit to the home of 'Mrs. Ocracoke,' Alice Rondthaler. Her current interest is the creative summer program sponsored by the Methodist Church and she was making plans to have a yard sale, and also a tour of her home, her late husband's shop and trailer. 'Only 10 cents for a look at the building; a look under the bed to see a Greek Bible for another 10 cents; and cans and cans of used paint, all colors and sizes, will be for sale. You get to shake the cans, too, before you pay your 10 cents,' Mrs. Rondthaler smiled."

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is the story of late 19th century steamship traffic to Ocracoke, and the large Victorian hotel that accommodated the guests. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Monthly Newsletter

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 08/21/2014 - 04:35
We just published our latest Ocracoke Newsletter. This month I share with our readers the fascinating story of steamship traffic to Ocracoke in the late 19th century. This includes information about the large Victorian hotel on the island, and the storm of 1899.














You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news082114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Water, Water Everywhere

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 08/20/2014 - 04:52
As you might imagine, people living on an island miles from the mainland have endured more than an average number of accidental drownings.

According to a newspaper account of July 26, 1885 Ocracoke native, Benjamin Joseph Garrish, Sr., "had a fit and fell overboard and was drowned, in about 18 inches of water, last week."

Benjamin and his wife Mary Jane already had five children. Less than two weeks after Benjamin's death Mary delivered their sixth child. He was named Benjamin Joseph Garrish, Jr.

Benjamin, Jr. served for many years in the U.S. Life Saving Service, often risking his life to save others from a watery grave. His son Monford (Monk) served in the US Coast Guard (the successor to the USLSS) during WWII in the South Pacific and at Ocracoke. 

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Washington Collegiate Institute

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 08/19/2014 - 05:01
Ocracoke School's first graduating class was in 1931 when Russell Williams, Mable Fulcher, and Lucy Garrish finished the eleventh grade (the highest grade available at the time). Prior to that year a number of Ocracoke teenagers left the island after the eighth grade to attend the Washington Collegiate Institute in Washington, NC.

























In the school year 1929-1930 Salina Ballance, Lela Howard, and Virginia Howard were enrolled as seniors. Elsie Ballance and Lucille O'Neal were sophomores.
































Salina Ballance is in the second row, second from the right; Lela Howard is in the third row, fourth from the right; and Virginia Howard is in the back row, third from the right.

Founded by the Board of Education of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Institute opened its door to students on October 1, 1913.

All students paid $5.00 at the beginning of each semester. Day students paid an additional $6.00 per month, and boarding students paid $25.00 per month. An extra fee of $5.00 covered literary, athletic, and laboratory expenses.


















The application process was simple:


















The Great Depression had a serious impact on the Washington Collegiate Institute, from which it was unable to recover. The Institute closed its doors in the early 1930s, but by then Ocracoke School was offering higher secondary education.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

It's Who You Know...

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 08/18/2014 - 05:10
Eduardo's Taco Stand is a popular destination for folks seeking delicious and authentic Mexican take-out food.

Several days ago I went there to order two servings of Quesadillas, some Tacos, and a Chorizo. Imagine my surprise when Eduardo presented the order to me. As an added bonus he handed me this ceramic plate, artistically arranged with chips and guacamole.














"Just bring the plate back when it's convenient," Eduardo said with a broad smile.

I suppose you might receive this kind of service somewhere else, but it sure is nice to live in a small community where people know you...and do extra special nice things for you. Thank you Eduardo!

Be sure to stop by Eduardo's and place your order.You won't be disappointed!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Free Lots

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sun, 08/17/2014 - 04:32
This post is in reply to a reader's comment two days ago, questioning the 1885 offer to give away Ocracoke Island building lots.

I don't have any more information about the 1885 offer, but I did run across this notice in the December 10, 1895 issue of the Washington NC. Progress:

"Mr. George Credle is making arrangements to rebuild the pier and cisterns at the Ocracoke Hotel. He expects to put it in good condition and run it in good style. He will lay off lots and let people have them free to erect summer houses upon, who wish to do so and board at the Hotel."

I am not aware of anyone taking advantage of this offer.

Two years later, J.W. McWilliams of Ocracoke ran this notice in the Washington Progress:

"For Sale. Several building lots located on the most desirable part of Ocracoke Island. Parties wishing Summer Homes will find it to their interest to correspond with me. The lots will be sold at one half their vale."

I do not know what the asking price for a lot was in 1897, but a half century later island houses were selling for as little as $500.00.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Remembering

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sat, 08/16/2014 - 04:35
In March of this year, my childhood buddy, Wayne Teeter, died unexpectedly. We were nearly the same age. Wayne was born exactly two weeks after me in 1944. He would have been 70 years old today.

Last month I came across the following photo and blurb in a 1974 issue of the Carolina Beachcomber. I publish it today, on Wayne's birthday, as a tribute to an Ocracoke Island legend.


















"Wayne Teeter, owner of Pony Island Restaurant, also has an interest in horses and is pictured here with a week old colt, 'Creation's Crazy Horse.' He was sired by a beautiful and spirited stallion, 'Creation's Glamour' from a family of five world's harness champions. Rudy Waller owns the mare, Honey, and was on hand to show off the beautiful animals to the Beachcomber photographer. (Photo by Lucy S. Morris)"

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

A Prescient Pastor

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 08/15/2014 - 04:31
An earlier post included a quotation by the Reverend Jno.[John] F. Butt about Ocracoke. In that same 1885 article he goes on to say,

"With a short walk you can find Ocean bathing, and wonderful to say, you can get good board there for four and five dollars a week, considerable cheaper than two and a half and three dollars per day. Some capitalist might make a profitable thing to go there and fit up for a summer resort, where it is real pleasant and healthy. They offer to give any one a lot of an acre or two who will go there and build on it."

Needless to say, "some capitalists" did discover Ocracoke. In the same year this article was written entrepreneurs from Washington, North Carolina, recognizing the potential for profit on Ocracoke Island, built a large Victorian hotel where the decommissioned Coast Guard Station stands today. 

The Ponzer Hotel, 1885-1900











Look for more information about the hotel, and steamship traffic to Ocracoke, in an upcoming monthly Newsletter. 

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Opry

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 08/14/2014 - 04:40
If you are on the island any Wednesday throughout the season be sure to come out to Deepwater Theater for an evening's entertainment at the Ocracoke Opry!

The two-hour show (that includes an intermission) features local musicians, singers, and storytellers. The program varies from week to week, but you will always delight to the music of Molasses Creek.

Photo by Sue Brocklebank















In addition, the show usually includes performances by "Ray Gun Ruby" (April, Kenny & Lou), Marcy, and Sundae. John Golden is often present with traditional and original songs of the sea. And this summer Kim France has been in the show entertaining audiences with her upright bass and melodious voice. A bit of jazz...and a couple of songs from the local musical, A Tale of Blackbeard, round at the evening.

I am always happy to share a story about Ocracoke...and I love joining in the finale with my dancing man (custom made for me by John Golden).

Photo by Sue Brocklebank


















The dancing man is always a big hit, especially when he "takes the stage." As a friend often remarks, I get more attention for less talent than anyone he knows!

So, come on out to the theater on School Road Wednesday evenings. Shows start at 8 pm. For more information click here: http://www.molassescreek.com/deepwater-theater.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Mysterious Ships, 1921

Ocracoke Island Journal - Wed, 08/13/2014 - 04:37
 In the August issue of the Ocracoke Observer there is a reprint of a short article published in the Greenville News, August 3, 1921. It was about a "mysterious steamer...with no name visible" that was seen "loitering" off Ocracoke "a day or two ago." The master "appeared to be intent upon keeping the craft's identity secret" and the incident "recalled to Ocracokers the recent fury over the disappearance of a score of ships...." in the vicinity.

Six months earlier, on January 31, 1921 the Carroll A. Deering, a five-masted schooner, mysteriously wrecked on Diamond Shoals with all sails set and no one on board. The Deering has come to be known as the "Ghost Ship of the Outer Banks." Portions of the wreck washed up on Ocracoke's beach, and were visible on the north end of the island for decades.

The Deering (US Coast Guard Photo)
Ghost Ship Wreck, Courtesy M. R. Dickson






















The editors of the Ocracoke Observer asked readers with knowledge of other "mysterious ships" near Ocracoke around that time to contact them. I have alerted the editors to the following report published in the Morning Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, July 12, 1921:

Mystery Steamer Reported Prowling

Freighter Reports it was Circled at Night

Craft, Bearing Only One Light and Ignoring All Signals, Then Speeds Away.

NEW YORK, July 11. (Special.) Two more reports of strange happenings out on the Atlantic were brought here today by steamships. The little Norwegian freighter Fort Morgan came into port raked and torn from a collision south of Diamond shoals with an unidentified schooner that was sailing without lights, officers of the Fort Morgan said.

Then the British freighter Croxteth Hall reported that a mysterious steamer, running without lights, circled around her 750 miles southeast of Halifax and vanished in the night without giving her identity.

It takes quite a ship, to sail around the Croxteth Hall, which was formerly one of the German freighters and steams along at ten knots and better. She came from Antwerp.

Her master. Captain Spence. said the stranger, which appeared to be a small freighter, was first sighted ahead, showing a stern light. The Croxteth Hall caught up with her and the latter suddenly veered off and dropped astern. Then the stranger, with a burst of speed, came right at the Britisher and passed up around her.

The steamer's lights were out. The red and green running lights of the strangely-acting vessel were not burning and when the Croxteth Hall first overhauled her the stern light disappeared.

Repeated efforts were made by Captain Spence to signal the other vessel by flashlight code and wireless, but she did not answer the inquiries as to her identity. She ran with the Croxteth Hall for a time and then moved off out of sight.

Captain Spence first thought the other ship might be one of the Ice patrol boats. After he made his report to Sanderson & Sons, agents here for his ship, officials of the company said they did not connect the occurrence with the many suspicions of a mystery ship with piratical intent operating out at sea.

 The Fort Morgan came into port just after the Croxteth Hall, with her funnel torn down and wreckage strewn about her deck from her collision. She is a 1120-ton freighter operated by the Federal Steamship company and brought a cargo of bananas from Jamaica.

When she came steaming up the coast without a funnel the men on the pilot boat could hardly believe their eyes. John L. Hall, a pilot, boarded her and did not know what she was. When she was 60 miles south by east of Cape Hatteras at 8:30 P. M. Saturday a sailing vessel without lights was passed. Half an hour later Early Hangsrud, the lookout on the forecastle head, sang out "Ship off port bow, sir." Captain Erling Hervig was in his bunk and Chief Officer Barstad was on the bridge. The Fort Morgan was slipping through the water easily and the night was dark.

It was seen the sailing vessel was without lights. Quartermaster Olaf Christianson, who was maintaining the watch on the Fort Morgan, thought he saw a man on the sailing craft rushing forward, carrying a port light.

The Fort Morgan's helm was put over hard and she tried to get away. but the sailer came on. Her high Jibboom struck the port end of the steamer's bridge, tearing that side of the bridge away. It raked aft, ripping out part of the officers' quarters. Fortunately no one was asleep there. The jibboom next caught the steamer's funnel and mowed it down, together with the mainmast.

Fortunately the sailer's fiddle bow sheered the little freighter off before her stem could crush the steamer's plates. The Fort Morgan careened and her electric lights went out.

The 27 men in her crew stumbled about in the dark. Captain Hervig tumbled out of his bunk and tried to megaphone the other craft, but she disappeared in the darkness. He said he could not see whether she was badly damaged or not, but he was certain her head gear must have been carried away. He and the others on the Fort Morgan said they thought the other vessel was a schooner of about 1300 tons with four or five masts.

The Fort Morgan's steam steering gear was disabled by the collision and the rest of the way here she was steered by hand. Captain Hervig said it was almost a miracle that the vessel was not sunk.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.  
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Surprise!

Ocracoke Island Journal - Tue, 08/12/2014 - 05:00
Whenever I walk along the Hammock Hills Nature trail I keep my eyes open for wildlife. Two days ago I stepped onto one of the wooden walkways before I noticed a dark snake just ahead. My footsteps startled the snake, and immediately it slithered down into the vines and vegetation.

I was lucky to be able to retrieve my smart phone and snap this one photo before he/she disappeared beneath the leaves and pine needles.


















I am not sure what species of snake this is. I am guessing a mature Northern Water Snake, but I am no expert on snakes. Maybe one of our readers can identify it. (Use the instructions on the right to enlarge the photo.)

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm


Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Esperanto

Ocracoke Island Journal - Mon, 08/11/2014 - 04:21
On August 3rd I wrote about our new friends from the Netherlands, Nanne Kalma & Ankie van der Meer. Lou Ann made this short video of Nanne & Ankie playing their music on the porch of the Black Schooner gift shop.


I mentioned once before that Nanne and Ankie are the only people I've ever known who speak Esperanto. According to lernu!, "a multilingual website that provides free courses and information on Esperanto," "you can learn Esperanto easily and free of charge."

This is what I learned from Nanne & Ankie, and from the above mentioned web site:
  • Esperanto is most useful for communicating among people of diverse nations who do not have a common mother tongue. 
  • It doesn't belong to one people or country, so it works as a neutral language. 
  • When you use Esperanto, you feel more equal from a linguistic standpoint than when, for example, you speak Spanish with a native Spanish speaker. 
  • Thanks to the structure of Esperanto, it's usually much easier to master than other foreign languages. 
  • Esperanto evolves and lives just like other languages, and it can be used to express the most varied facets of human thought and emotion. 
With between 100,000 and 2,000,000 people worldwide who speak Esperanto fluently the language is particularly useful for international travel (follow this link to learn more).

Just thought I would share the above interesting information that I learned right here on Ocracoke Island. Maybe a few of our readers will be inspired to learn Esperanto!

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Genealogy & Island History

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sun, 08/10/2014 - 05:14
A couple of weeks ago a reader asked if any of my grandchildren were interested in island history and genealogy. My oldest granddaughter, Zoe, periodically asks for information about our ancestors. And, this summer, my oldest grandson, Eakin, was on the island (you may have seen him selling his birdhouses along NC 12). He was interested in knowing about our family history. One afternoon we rode our bikes around the village, visiting graves of long-departed ancestors. Lou Ann took this photo of Eakin and me at the kitchen table perusing Earl O'Neal's book about the Howard family of Ocracoke.













Last month the Ocracoke Preservation Society hosted a get-together on the front porch of the museum to celebrate Earl O'Neal's 85th birthday. Family and friends gathered to wish Earl a Happy Birthday, and to chat with him about island history and his on-going research.


















Earl has contributed an unprecedented volume of local research about our community: history, stories, photographs, documents, and extensive genealogies of several island families.

Thank you, Earl! And belated birthday greetings.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Charlie Mac

Ocracoke Island Journal - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 04:30
On July 15 I published a photo of a Canada Goose a reader believed had been carved by Ocracoke native Charles MacWilliams (Charlie Mac). Not long afterwards I was visiting Cousin Blanche, and the conversation turned to bird carving. Blanche mentioned that she had one of Charlie Mac's birds that was carved from a mast of the schooner, Carroll A. Deering. The decoy is not signed, but Blanche purchased it directly from Charlie Mac.

Blanche was gracious enough to allow me to make a photo of the Mallard carving:














Charlie Mac often included a typed note with these decoys that read, "The wood in this hand-carved decoy came from one of the five masts of the schooner Carroll A. Deeering, wrecked in a great storm on Diamond Shoals off Cape Hatteras more than forty years ago [the Deering wrecked in 1921]. After she had been dynamited, one section of this famous Ghost Ship was driven ashore at Ocracoke Island in another storm, where I salvaged a mast. I carved this body from the mast, carved the head out of a natural driftwood knee found on the beach, and then painted the decoy."

Below is one of Charlie Mac's signed decoys from my personal collection...but it was not carved from a mast of the Carroll A. Deering. However, the resemblance in style is noticeable.














It is difficult to tell of the goose pictured on July 15 was carved by Charlie Mac. Perhaps it was...or maybe not.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Fig Cake Bake-Off

Ocracoke Island Journal - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 05:13
As most of our readers know, Hurricane Arthur was not kind to our planned Fourth of July Celebration. But Ocracokers are a resilient bunch of people. Several of the cancelled activities have been re-scheduled.

Next Friday, August 15, 2014, from 3-5 pm the Ocracoke Civic & Business Association will host a Fig Cake Bake-Off. Bring your cake to the Community Square.

There will be two award categories: Traditional and Innovative.

Fig Cake by Island Visitor, Bear MacDonald















At 6pm I will be calling a traditional Ocracoke Island Square Dance. Molasses Creek will provide live music.  Fig Cake Bake-Off Awards and Announcements are scheduled for 7 pm, followed by a  Dance with the Ocracoke Rockers 8-10pm!

You can read more on the Ocracoke Current: http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/89983.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm.   
Categories: Outer Banks Blogs

Lou Ann

Ocracoke Island Journal - Thu, 08/07/2014 - 05:13
Every summer Lou Ann shares her enthusiasm for life, her storytelling talents, and her love of Ocracoke with islanders and visitors. You may have met her working at the Preservation Museum, presenting her "Radio Show" at the Wednesday night Opry, sharing stories & history at the lighthouse, or leading an evening Ghost and History Walk.

At the Lighthouse














Starting in mid-August Lou Ann will be in the Midwest, performing an original show at the Frank & Katrina Basile Theatre at the Phoenix Theatre 749 N Park Ave, Indianapolis, Indiana.

If you are in that area, Lou Ann invites you to her new show, City Girl Meets Mother Earth.

Even if you have never raised a garden, cooked on a wood stove or ridden a pig, you will be delighted with her, "What was I thinking?" story. This is Lou Ann's third season with IndyFringe.

Performances are scheduled as follows:
  • Friday-Aug 15-6:00pm 
  • Saturday-Aug 16-10:30pm 
  • Tuesday-Aug 19-9:00pm 
  • Thursday-Aug 21-7:30pm 
  • Saturday-Aug 23-9:00pm 
  • Sunday-Aug 24-3:00pm
Of course we miss Lou Ann, and everything she brings to Ocracoke...but our loss is Indiana's gain. And, we know that she will be back again, full of energy and enthusiasm, sharing her love of Ocracoke in her unique fashion.

You can follow Lou Ann on her web site:  www.louannhoman.com.

Our latest Ocracoke Newsletter is an article about the Ocracoke Crab Festival which was held each May from 1984 to 1989. You can read it here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news072114.htm

Categories: Outer Banks Blogs
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